World Congress and Expo on
Nanotechnology and Materials Science
April 13-15, 2015, Dubai, UAE

Scientific Programme(Day 3 : Apr-15-2015)

Applications of Nanotechnology
Risks and Regulation of Nanotechnology

Session Introduction

Anton Liopo
TomoWave Laboratories Inc., USA
Title: Nanoparticles for optoacoustic and theranostic applications
Biography:
Dr. Liopo has many years of experience in biochemistry of bioactive compounds, human and animal physiology and investigation of the structural and functional changes of cells membrane. Since 2010 Anton Liopo is senior scientist of TomoWave Laboratories Inc. Houston, TX, USA, where he is currently performing the investigations of nanoparticles for improving optoacoustic imaging, laser nanothermolysis, and molecular sensing. He established that there are gold nanorods with plasmon resonance from 600 till 1500 nm, polymeric nanoparticles and nanocomposites. Dr. Liopo has served as a member of the International conference committees many times and he has more than 60 peer-review publications, include monograph, book chapters and patents.

Abstract:
The aim of the presentation is to provide an overview of literature and our own data on nanoparticle-based contrast agents for optoacoustic and theranostics applications. Particular focus is given to metal nanoparticles such as gold nanorods (GNRs), hollow gold nanospheres, and nanocages that possess strong optical absorption due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The particle synthesis and functionalization for cell targeting for specific contrast and molecular imaging were analyzed. GNRs were reviewed as optical and optoacoustic contrast agents with near infrared absorption and highly efficient transfer of light energy into heat. These properties demonstrate the role of GNRs in comprehensive cancer diagnostics and treatment. The conjugates of GNRs based on their low toxicity are considered promising for wide range of biomedical applications. GNRs were evaluated as theranostic agents for optoacoustic imaging combined with photothermal therapy. We also described biodegradable optoacoustic contrast agents such as nanoparticles containing melanin and organic dyes in view of their biocompatibility and minimal toxicity. All GNR with LSPR from 600 to 1500 nm were manufactured for optoacoustic imaging at TomoWave Labs Inc., located in Houston, TX, USA.

Irene D’Amico
University of York, UK
Title: Disorder and Anderson localization in spin chains
Biography:
Irene D’Amico is Professor in Physics at the University of York and Fellow of the Institute of Physics. She leads the Semiconductor Spintronics and Quantum Information Research Group and her main scientific interests are in condensed matter theory, solid state-based quantum information, and in semiconductor spintronics, both at the fundamental level as well as their device-related applications. D’Amico has written more than 100 publications and has been invited to give more than 75 talks at conferences, workshops, colloquia, and seminars worldwide.

Abstract:
Spin chains have been proposed as components of quantum devices, for example to transfer quantum information in solid state systems or to create and distribute entanglement. They could be embodied by very different physical systems, for example by strings of localized spins or linear chains of quantum dots with ground state excitons as pseudospins. Here we discuss the effect of disorder on the transfer of quantum information across spin chains. Disorder may induce the phenomenon of Anderson localization in a variety of media. It may in fact lead to destructive quantum interference of the multiple scattering paths of a particle or a wave, compromising its diffusion in the media and localising the wave packet in a specific region. We consider the effect of disorder on one-dimensional spin chains set up for 'perfect state transfer', where, due to a specific set of coupling between the spins, a quantum state can be transferred from one chain end to the other by simply letting the system evolve under the action of its natural Hamiltonian. This transfer dynamics has a well defined period. Our calculations show that a moderate amount of disorder could indeed induce Anderson localization in these one-dimensional systems. The level of localization depends on the chain length and on the injection site, becoming stronger for longer spin chains and for injection at the chain end. These findings have practical implications for quantum devices based on spin chains, as disorder from e.g. fabrication defects might then lead to limiting the applicability of 'perfect state transfer' conditions.

Gediminas Mainelis
Rutgers University, USA
Title: Nanoparticles in Consumer Products: Should the Users be Concerned?
Biography:
Dr. Gediminas “Gedi” Mainelis is a Professor of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA. Dr. Mainelis’ research focuses on various health-related aspects of aerosols, including exposure to manufactured nanoparticles. His research has been presented in more than 60 peer-reviewed publications, 130 conference presentations and several book chapters. Dr. Mainelis is a recipient of CDC/NIOSH Career Award, Twinning Fellowship from the US National Academy of Sciences, and Research Excellence Award from the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences of Rutgers University. He is also an editor of Aerosol and Air Quality Research journal.

Abstract:
A variety of nanotechnology-enabled consumer products are commercially available and these products have a potential to release nanoparticles during their application, which can result in user exposures. This research investigated inhalation exposures to nanoparticles due to the use of various consumer products, including powders, sprays and clothing items. We realistically simulated the use of various products and the released particles were analyzed using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. A compact electrostatic collector was used to capture airborne particles to examine their shape and agglomeration using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), while an ICP-MS method was used to investigate the presence of metals in the products. We found that nanosized particles were released during the use of almost all investigated products, and the particle number concentration varied substantially depending on the product and product category. Some of the highest released nanoparticle concentrations were observed for spray products reaching concentrations as high as 10^6/cm^3. The release of submicron and supermicron particles was also observed, indicative of the release of nanoparticle agglomerates and nanoparticles attached to larger particles stemming from product matrices. Presence of various metals such as Ag, Zn, Ti and others was observed in the released particles. For nanotechnology-enabled clothing, the release of supermicron particles changed when the clothing items were washed due to the loss of integrity in product matrix. Our results show that the use of investigated nanotechnology-enabled products would result in the release of nanoparticles and their agglomerates leading to particle inhalation exposure.

Michitaka Suzuki
University of Hyogo, Japan
Title: Functional surface treatment using nanoparticle coating
Biography:


Abstract:
The rugged surface produced by the nanoparticle coating on a substrate is very effective to prevent water adhesion and maintain the transparency. So, we developed the novel water repellent using nanoparticle for the side mirror of a car or the lens of a camera. The rugged surface by coating is also very effective to prevent powder adhesion. The measured and calculated results by Van der Waals force show that adhesion force decreased with the increment of the surface roughness. From the results, nanoparticle coating is very effective to prevent the dust adhesion on the substrate and the various applications of nanoparticle coating can be expected. For example, the nano-particle coating on a textile, the tiny roughness can be created on a textile and the preventive effect of dust particle adhesion can be given to the cloth. In order to add the functionality to the preventive effect of dust adhesion on the clothes in a practical uses, the improvement in the durability for washing is very important. From our experimental results, the durability of the nano-particle coating and the preventive effect of dust adhesion can be improved using actualized polyvinyl alcohol treatment of the cloth.

Kristina Kejlova
National Institute of Public Health, Czech Republic
Title: Safety of of TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles used in consumer products
Biography:
Dr. Kristina Kejlová graduated from the Charles University in Prague and received her Ph.D. at the Palacký University in Olomouc. She works as the Head of Unit for Alternative Toxicological Methods at the National Institute of Public Health in Prague. She is an OECD and EURL-ECVAM expert for in vitro methods. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:
The use of nanomaterials in consumer products has the potential to enhance quality of life and boost Europe´s industrial competitiveness, but on the other hand raises concerns regarding human health safety. Centre of Toxicology and Health Safety at the National Institute of Public Health has been for decades focused on evaluation of toxicological properties and health safety of consumer products including their ingredients and implementation of alternative toxicological methods to animal experiments. The laboratory research includes development and verification of progressive methods for morphological characterization of nanoparticles and identification of biomarkers of exposure and toxic effects using toxicological methods in vitro based on human cells and tissues. As the most frequently used nanomaterials in the Czech Republic are UV absorber TiO2 and colloidal nano-silver, the presented results comprise these two ingredients of consumer products. Physico-chemical parameters of the nanomaterials (in the form of suspension/dispersion, powder or applied on cells and tissues) were analysed using atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Biological methods in vitro were employed for investigation of cytotoxicity and phototoxicity in cell cultures, measurement of mitochondrial membrane and intracelullular ROS production, local toxicity and bioavailability based on absorption/penetration rate using reconstructed human tissues and identification of inflammatory reactions by ELISA method. The results serve control authorities in the Czech Republic for nanomaterials risk assessment and management. The research is supported by the Internal Grant Agency of the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic (NT 14060-3/2013).

Jeng-Da Chai
National Taiwan University, Taiwan
Title: Thermally-Assisted-Occupation Density Functional Theory
Biography:
Dr. Jeng-Da Chai received his Ph.D. degree in Chemical Physics from the University of Maryland (December 2005). After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Chai performed postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley (January 2006 ~ June 2009). Since August 2009, he has joined the faculty of the Department of Physics at National Taiwan University. His group has focused on the development of new quantum-mechanical methods suitable for the study of nanoscale systems, and their applications to materials for new energy. As of now, one of the SCI papers published by Dr. Chai has been cited more than 1,100 times.

Abstract:
In this talk, I will briefly describe the formulation of our recently proposed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154104 (2012)] and the density functional approximations to TAO-DFT [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A521 (2014)]. In contrast to Kohn-Sham DFT, TAO-DFT is a DFT with fractional orbital occupations given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution (controlled by a fictitious temperature), for the study of large ground-state systems with strong static correlation effects. Relative to TAO-LDA (i.e., the local density approximation to TAO-DFT), TAO-GGAs (i.e., the generalized-gradient approximations to TAO-DFT) are significantly superior for a wide range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, and reaction energies. For noncovalent interactions, TAO-GGAs with empirical dispersion corrections are shown to yield excellent performance. Due to their computational efficiency for systems with strong static correlation effects, TAO-LDA and TAO-GGAs are applied to study the electronic properties of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 100), which is very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. Some interesting results will be presented in this talk.

Ahmad Nazrun Shuid
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia
Title: Targeted Deliveries of Tocotrienol and Statin Nanoparticles to Promote Fracture Healing
Biography:
Dr Ahmad Nazrun Shuid is a Professor of Pharmacology at the Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Medicine UKM (University Kebangsaan Malaysia). He graduated with a medical degree from RCSI in 1997 and completed his PhD in UKM in 2005. He is a member of the Bone Metabolism Research Group with the interest in the use of natural product for treatment of osteoporosis. He has published more than 70 articles in ISI/Scopus indexed journal and has represented his research group to international expos and conventions.

Abstract:
Combination of oral tocotrienol and statin was shown to be effective in prevention of osteoporosis. In this study, tocotrienol and statin nanoparticles were injected directly to the fracture site of osteoporotic fracture model. Tocotrienol and statin were combined with poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-(DL-lactide) polymers respectively, which acted as their carriers. Their particles were slowly released to the fracture site to promote healing. Sprague-Dawley female rats were used as osteoporotic fracture model and divided into 6 groups. The first group was sham-operated (SO), while the others were ovariectomized. After two months, the right tibiae of all the rats were fractured at proximal upper third area and fixed with plates and screws. The SO and ovariectomized-control rats (OVxC) were given two single injections of carriers. The estrogen group (positive control, OVx+ERT) was given daily oral gavages of Premarin® (64.5 µg/kg). The Lovastatin treatment group (OVx + Lov) was given a single injection of 750 µg/kg lovastatin particles. The tocotrienol group (OVx + TT) was given a single injection of 60 mg/kg tocotrienol particles. The combination treatment group (OVx+ Lov+ TT) was given two single injections of 750 µg/kg lovastatin particles and 60 mg/kg tocotrienol particles. After 4 weeks of treatment, the fractured tibiae were dissected out for micro-CT and biomechanical assessments. Only combined treatment group (OVx+ Lov+ TT) showed significantly better callous structure but all treatment groups showed better callous strength than OVxC group. In conclusion, combined injections of tocotrienol and lovastatin nanoparticles may promote fracture healing of osteoporotic bone.

Andreas Nowak
Leica Mikrosysteme Austria, Austria
Title: Innovative sample preparation method of hard, porous, heterogeneous as well as heat sensitive materials for SEM applications
Biography:


Abstract:
Sample Preparation is a prerequisite for microscopy and it is essential for achieving accurate and reproducible results, obtaining the best results when studying characterization of the n sample surfaces. Leica Microsystems Vienna developed a triple ion beam milling system for Scanning Electron Microscopy observation - Microstructure Analysis (EDS, WDS, Auger, and EBSD) as well as AFM investigations. Triple ion beams are integrated into the ion beam milling system, Leica EM TIC 3X to optimize the processing conditions of sample preparation to reveal the nano-sized features of the specimen. The modular design of the Leica EM TIC3X allows in addition to the cross section technique, large area ion beam polishing - by using a rotary stage. The newly developed TIC3X with vacuum cryo docking port allows the placing of this ion beam milling system in to the workflow of cryogenic and/or environmentally sensitive samples, providing optimal preparation and transfer conditions to the point of investigation.

Andrey N. Rybyanets
Southern Federal University, Russia
Title: Nanoparticles transport in solid matrixes: A novel approach for nanostructured materials fabrication
Biography:
Andrey N. Rybyanets was born in Rostov on Don, Russia in 1958. He received his MS and PhD degrees in Physics and Mathematics from Rostov State University. From 1997 to 1998, he worked at Sunlight Ultrasound Technologies Ltd., Israel, where he was VP of Ceramic Technologies. From 2004 to 2008 he was VP of Ultrashape Ltd., Israel. Since 2008 he has been a Director of the Center of Perspective Research and Development,, Southern Federal University.. He has published 7 monographies, more than 39 papers in reputed journals and is a holder of 2 Russian and 11 US Patents and Patent Applications.

Abstract:
In recent years, multiphase ceramic composites are widely used for industrial and functional elements applications. Nanoparticles are perfect building blocks offering a wide variety of compositions, structures and properties, ideally suited to designing functional nanomaterials and nanodevices. Nanoparticles can be embedded in various matrixes. A major technological problem is spontaneous aggregation of nanoparticles which, as a result, lose their unique properties. One possible solution to this problem is to use supports interacting with nanoparticles. Many organic polymers have been used in various nanoparticle surface engineering approaches. Recently polymer nano and microgranules filled with nanoparticles (magnetic, metal, oxides etc.) start widely used as a delivery means of nanosubstances in medical, biotechnology and chemical applications. A novel approach for fabrication of nano- and microporous piezoceramics as well as ceramic matrix piezocomposites were proposed. The technique is based on nanoparticles transport in ceramic matrixes using as a porosifiers a polymer nanogranules coated or filled with a various chemicals, with successive porous ceramics fabrication processes. Resulting ceramic matrix piezocomposites are composed by super lattices of closed pores filled or coated by nanoparticles of metals, oxides, ferromagnetics etc. embedded in piezoceramic matrix. New family of nano- and microporous piezoceramics and ceramic matrix piezocomposites are characterized by a unique spectrum of the electrophysical properties unachievable for standard PZT ceramic compositions and fabrication methods, including giant dielectric relaxation, giant piezoelectric and electrocaloric effects and the possibility of controllable changes of the main properties within a wide range.

Anna N. Popova
Kemerovo Scientific Center of the Siberian Branch of the RAS, Russia
Title: Iron-Platinum, Iron-Nickel and Iron-Cobalt nano–powders: Preparation and its properties
Biography:
Anna N. Popova has completed her PhD at the age of 29 years from Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. She is the Researcher of Institute of Coal-chemistry and Material Science of the Siberian Branch of the RAS. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an reviewer of repute (Materials Letters).

Abstract:
In recent years, a great interest has been devoted to nanocrystalline metallic alloys. It is well known that nanosized materials exhibit some properties strongly influenced by their particles size. Iron-cobalt (FeCo), iron-nickel (FeNi) and, especially, iron-platinum (FePt) alloys are expected to present interesting magnetic properties when prepared in nanocrystalline form, but, at the present, there is a few experimental results reported in literature concern these alloys, because it appears quite difficult to obtain nanocrystalline alloys. Nevertheless FeCo, FeNi and FePt alloys attractive for its high-technological applications. This research is a cycle of works with multifactorial planning conditions of synthesis (a variation of concentration, submission speed and mixing of reagents, pH, influence of magnetic fields) to definite dependence of product properties (such as, phase structure, state of particles surface, dispersiveness, porosity, magnetic susceptibility, temperature of phase transformation) on its preparation conditions. In this work, properties of chemical synthesized alloys by reducing salt solutions with hydrazine-hydrate were investigated: phase structure and disperse structure of samples – by small-angle X-ray powder scattering (SAXRS) and wide-angle X-ray powder diffraction (WAXRD) methods, a specific surface – by BAT's method, morphology and nanoparticles form – by electronic microscopy, structure of impurity – by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) with co-applying of mass-spectrometry (MS) of influential products. For the first time it was synthesized single-phase NSP of two-component system – FeNi and FeCo. The sizes, form and morphological features of NSP were estimated by applying of images received on scanning electronic microscope. Also, it was discovered cut of temperature dependences phase structure, magnetic characteristics of FePt, FeNi and FeCo NSP.

Masooma Ibrahim
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Title: Polyoxometalates (POMs): Discrete Anionic Metal-Oxide Nanoclusters
Biography:


Abstract:
Polyoxometalates (POMs) have recently acquired a remarkable place in the field of inorganic chemistry due to their enormous structural diversity and applicability in various fields such as catalysis, analytical chemistry, magnetism, nanotechnology, and medicine.[1] Further POMs are anionic transition metal oxide clusters with significant potential to rearrange into another form or remain intact depending on different variables i.e. pH, temperature, concentration, reaction medium and counterions.[2] So far a significant number of classical lacunary Keggin- and Wells-Dawson-based polyoxotungstates incorporating transition metal centers have been reported,[3] however it is still a great challenge to discover new class of POMs.In the course of this work we were able to isolate several unique and uncommon POMs in simple one-pot reactions and structurally characterized in detail using analytical methods like FT-IR, single crystal XRD, and thermal analysis.

Xiaohui Wang
Tsinghua University, China
Title: Enhanced photocatalysis of ANbO3 (A = Na, K) nanoparticles and electrospun nanofibers
Biography:


Abstract:
The photocatalysis of perovskite-type ANbO3 (A = K, Na), with good stability and low toxicity under UV-Vis light illumination, microparticles, nanofibers, and nanoparticles on RhB aqueous solutions were investigated in the study. KNbO3 and NaNbO3 nanofibers were prepared by sol-gel based electrospinning and KNbO3 and NaNbO3 nanoparticles were synthesized by a water-based citrate precursor sol-gel process. The reaction rate constant of the nanoparticles, nanofibers and microparticles are decreasing in sequence. The mechanism responsible for the enhancement of photocatalytic activity was discussed. Firstly, the distance that photon-generated electrons and holes have to migrate to reaction sites on the surface becomes short when particle size gets small. Secondly, the nanostructured samples with high BET surface area have the large area contact with RhB aqueous solutions. Thirdly, the defects on the surface of nanostructured samples can trap the photon-generated electrons and holes and lead to a decrease in the recombination probability. Fourthly, the band gap energy of nanostructured samples is lower than microparticles and thus the nanostructured samples can lead to the more efficient use of irradiation. Finally, VB maximum energy of nanostructured samples is higher than microparticles, which can result in the higher mobility and the better photo-oxidation of photon-generated holes. This study is potentially applicable to a range of low-dimensional niobate-based nanostructures with applications in photocatalysis and relevant areas.

Md Enamul Hoque
University of Nottingham, Malaysia
Title: Gelatin nanofibrous matrix: Characterization and evaluation of nanometal release
Biography:
Dr Md Enamul Hoque is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical, Materials & Manufacturing Engineering and served as Head for the Bioengineering Research Group at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus. He received his PhD in Bioengineering from NUS, Singapore in 2007. He has been intensively involved in numerous research projects that are collaborated locally and internationally. His research has been funded by quite a number of funding bodies including Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), Nottingham University intercampus research fund etc. He has graduated 3 PhD Students and currently supervising 5 PhD students in collaboration with some local as well as global academics/ researchers. So far, he has filed 2 Malaysian patents out of his research innovations, authored 2 books, edited 2 books and co-authored 7 book chapters. He has also published more than 110 technical papers in high impact referred journals and international conference proceedings. He serves as an editor for 5 journals, as member of editorial board for 6 journals, and technical reviewer for about 25 journals. He has been invited to deliver speeches in a number of international conferences notably as plenary speaker, invited speaker and so on. He has also organized several scientific conferences around the world assuming various roles in the organizing committees. He is an Associate Fellow to the Higher Education Academy, UK. Besides, He is a member of several professional scientific bodies including Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS), Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), UK; Institute of Materials Malaysia (IMM) and Tissue Engineering Society Malaysia (TESMA). His research interests include the areas of Rapid Prototyping Technology, Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells, Nanomaterials, Composite Materials, Bioenergy and Food Technology.

Abstract:
Ionic nanometals (Ag+, Zn2+ and Cu2+) are being increasingly used for controlling microorganisms in various areas especially,in the treatment of wounds, skin ulcers, burns etc.The doping ofnanometal ions into the matrix surface is less toxic due to the low concentration level and the release is governed by the diffusion of the ion from the top surface layers of the matrix. In this study, the release kinetics of nanometal ions doped into the electrospun gelatin nanofibrous matrix was investigated. The release of nanometal ions from the nanofibrous matrices treated at different cross-linking timesimmersed in three different buffers (ultrapure water, normal saline solution and a human serum substitute) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscope (AAS) and titration technique. The highest release rate of nanometal ions was found during the first 60 minutes after immersion of the matrices in ultrapure water and normal saline solution and gradually increased afterwards. The matrices released the nanometal ions gradually over the testing period after immersion in the human serum substitute. Our results show that the nanofibrous matrix doped with silver ions has also outstanding antibacterial efficacy e.g. 40% reductionin growth of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureuscultured in luriabertani (LB) broth.

Gomah E. Nenaah
Najran University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Chemical composition, insecticidal activity and persistence of three Asteraceae essential oils and their nanoemulsions against Callosobruchus maculatus (F.)
Biography:
Dr. Gomah El Sayed Nenaah is currently an associate professor of biology department, college of arts and science, najran university, saudi Arabia. He is a peer reviewer of many international journals. He has published his research in many reputed journals and he has many honors and awards.

Abstract:
The performance of most phytochemicals, including plant oils in crop protection, is inadequate for major practical use due to concerns associated with extraction, formulation and application problems. There is an urgent need for new methods and innovative strategies for developing and strengthening the use of plant-based products as alternative pest control agents. In this context, nanotechnology has been emerged as a new field of interdisciplinary research dedicated to the creation, improvement and utility of nanoscale structures for biological bioassays. The increasing interest in the area of nanostructures, including nanoemulsions, is caused by the growing number of their promising applications in material science, medicine, and agriculture. In the current study, essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (L.), Achillea fragrantissima (Forssk.) and Tagetes minuta (L.) were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS). Nanoemulsions from the obtained oils were prepared using the High Pressure Homogenization (HPH) technique. The plant oils showed considerable ovicidal, adulticidal and residual activities against the cowpea beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), where A. conyzoides oil was the most toxic. Upon fumigation and 48 h post exposure period, eggs were less susceptible to the oils than adults, where LC50's ranged between (71.6 and 161.9 µl/l air) and (19.2 and 77.8 µl/l air) against eggs and adults, respectively. When prepared as nanoemulsions and tested as fumigants, toxicity of oils was increased dramatically, where LC50 values after 96 h of treatment reached (16.1-40.5 µl/l air) and (4.5-24.3 µl/l air) against eggs and adults, respectively. In a contact toxicity bioassay, adults were susceptible to the oils-treated filter papers, where LC50's after 96 h of treatment ranged between (37.1-110.8 µl/cm2). When mixed with kaolin powder and tested as contact adulticides, activity of oils increased compared with their application alone. The plant oils showed a weak to moderate residual adulticidal activity, where A. conyzoides oil was the most effective. The study recommends the potential of using the tested plant oils as natural grain protectants after the required toxicological assessments.

Hassen M. Ouakad
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia
Title: Nonlinear Dynamics and Vibration of Micro and Nano Systems
Biography:
HassenM. Ouakad received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Tunisia Polytechnic Schoolin 2007, an M.S. degree in computational mechanics from a joint graduate programbetween Virginia Tech and Tunisia polytechnic School in 2008, and a Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the State University of New-York (SUNY) at Binghamton, in 2010. Heis currently anassistantprofessor at the mechanical engineering department King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) wherehe serves as thedirector of the Micro and NanoCharacterization and Motion Laboratory. He authored and coauthored more than thirty journal and conference publications. Dr. Ouakad is a recipient of the 2010 SUNYoutstanding academic achievement in graduate studies award in theMechanical Engineering Department of the Watson School of Engineering and AppliedSciences. He filedtwoU.S. patents:one ona MEMS band-pass filter and one on the control of stamp deformation in micro-contact printing. He serves as an Associate Editor for International Journal of Applied Mechanics and Engineering (IJAME). He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME since 2008.

Abstract:
Few decades have passed by since the discovery and development of micro systems and particularly micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). This technology has reached a level of maturity that, today; several MEMS devices are being used in our everyday life, ranging from accelerometers and pressure sensors in automobilesto inertia sensors in video games. With the increasing demand for sensors and actuators of sophisticated functionalities, which are self-powered, self-calibrated, and self-tested, MEMS are expected to remain the sought-after technology for many years to come. However, with this growing demand come great challenges. Designers are now aiming to achieve complicated objectives while meeting a long list of specifications related to sensitivity, fabrication, system integration, packaging, and reliability. These challenges have created a strong demandto seek new solutions and ideas, beyond changing the geometry of devices and making more complex configurations. There is a need to look into new methods of improvement and innovation in MEMS beyond the static laws of design and the limitations of linear theory. It is realized now that linear theories are too shallow to allow for bolder ideas and more aggressive design goals.Dynamics and motion aspects of MEMS in the nonlinear regimes need to be deeply investigated and explored to reveal new opportunities of novel devices and new functionalities. The past decade has also seen the emergence of Nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) as natural progressions to MEMS, which promise to push the limits of sensitivity and range of operation of devices into new regimes. Thus far however, this technology has not met the initial promise due to many design challenges at the Nano scale, which are mostly related to vibration, dynamics and nonlinearities issues. Numerous strange behaviors and unexplained phenomena have been reported of NEMS-based Carbon nanotubes and Nano-wires, such as their inherent nonlinear behavior even when driven by very small electric loads, low quality factors, detection of unexpected resonances, and unexplained patterns of the dependence of their natural frequencies on the gate voltage. In order to successfully take NEMS from research labs to real-life applications, knowledge about these issues need to be acquired. This talk will discuss some of the ongoing research on the dynamics of Micro and Nano structuresconducted during my doctoral degree and at the micro and nano systems characterization and motion group at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The focus of the talk will be on electrically actuated micro and nano systems, which form the backbone of several important classes of devices, such as resonant sensors and band-pass filters. The presentationwill highlightinteresting dynamical aspects of devices rangingfrom mill to Nanoscale. New device concepts based on nonlinear dynamics principles, such hybrid sensors and actuators to detect acceleration and chemical gases, will be discussed.

Materials Science and Engineering
Advancements in Materials Science
Emerging areas of Materials Science

Session Introduction

Hyuck Mo Lee
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea
Title: Application of Nanotechnology to Pb-free Solders for Printed Electronics and Catalysis: Viewpoint of Computational Materials Science
Biography:
Prof. Hyuck Mo Lee has completed his PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, in 1989 and spent two sabbatical leaves at the University of California, Berkeley during 1993-94 and the Pennsylvania State University in 2000. He is the head of department of materials science and engineering at KAIST as well as a program director of the Brain Korea 21 Plus. He has published more than 180 papers in reputed journals and is serving as an overseas editor of Materials Transactions and an associate editor of Journal of Electronic Materials.

Abstract:
With the aid of phase diagrams and phase equilibria obtained from computational thermodynamics, the designing of Pb-free Sn-based solders for low-temperature, mid-temperature and high-temperature applications due to increasing environmental and health concerns over the use of lead has been successful and this approach also proved very useful in studying the interfacial reactions at the solder joints. Some of their examples are presented. When the nanotechnology is applied to the lead-free solder alloys, they may result in synthesis of Sn-based nanoparticles. A various size of bimetallic or unary nanoparticles were synthesized and they were eventually used in inkjet printing. The eutectic composition shift was observed in nano-sized particles as compared with bulk alloys. By controlling the size and eutectic composition, a significant melting temperature depression was achieved, which was beneficial to the low temperature printed electronics. The nano phase diagram of the corresponding material systems were obtained using molecular dynamics simulations. It revealed that apart from the melting temperature depression the structure of the solid state nanoparticles changed in relation to the composition and size. Additionally, the density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the CO oxidation and ORR of the nanoparticles. Among various determinant factors for catalytic performance, CO and O2 co-adsorption was calculated in critical compositions. In this way, their alloying effect on the catalytic properties was investigated.

Pance Naumov
New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE
Title: Smart Single Crystals
Biography:
Pance Naumov after acquiring his Ph.D. from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2004, Dr. Naumov worked at the National Institute for Materials Science, Osaka University and Kyoto University in Japan before he joined New York University in 2012. His publication portfolio includes over 140 publications that have been cited more than 1800 times, with an h-index of 22. He serves as a member of the review panels with the NSF, ERC and ACS. He is active reviewer for more than 40 journals published by the Nature Publishing Group, the American Chemical Society, Wiley-VCH, the Royal Society of Chemistry, Elsevier and other publishers.

Abstract:
The classical perception of single crystals of molecular materials as brittle entities has downsized the research interest in mechanical effects that had been initiated and was active back in the 1980s. More recently, the modern analytical techniques for mechanical, electron-microscopic, structural, spectroscopic and kinematic characterization have contributed to accumulate compelling evidence that under certain circumstances, even some seemingly rigid single crystals can deform, bend, twist, hop, wiggle or perform other ‘acrobatics’ that are atypical for non-soft matter. These examples contribute to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the elasticity of molecular crystals and also provide direct mechanistic insight into the structural perturbations at the limits of the susceptibility of ordered matter to internal and external mechanical force. As the relevance of motility and reshaping of molecular crystals is being recognized by the crystal research community as a demonstration of a very basic concept —conversion of thermal or light energy into work—a new and exciting crystal chemistry around mechanically responsive single crystals rapidly unfolds.

Shin-ichi Yusa
University of Hyogo, Japan
Title: Stimuli-responsive Powder Capsules
Biography:
Dr. Shin-ichi Yusa is a native of Japan and received B.S. (1993) and M.S. (1995) degrees in polymer chemistry from Osaka University under the direction of Professors Mikiharu Kamachi and Yotaro Morishima. He received a Ph.D. from Osaka University (2000). He joined Himeji Institute of Technology as an assistant professor in 1997. He became associate professor of University of Hyogo (2008). His research interests are in controlled radical polymerization and characterization of water-soluble polymers. He is currently on the editorial boards of Polymers, The Open Colloid Science Journal, and E-Journal of Chemistry.

Abstract:
Liquid marbles are liquid-in-gas dispersed systems prepared using hydrophobic particles adsorbed to a gas-liquid interface. They have attracted increasing attention with respect to their potential applications in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals in the home, and personal care products. The liquid marbles which are coated with hydrophobic particles can float on a water surface. Various particles have been used to prepare liquid marbles, including surface-modified silica, graphite, synthetic polymer particles, and carbon black powder. In this study, to obtain near-infrared (NIR)-responsive liquid marbles, we prepared liquid marbles using carbon nanotube (CNT), is are known to have high absorbance in the NIR region. It was possible to prepare liquid marbles from the CNT powder due to the hydrophobic nature. The preparation method was as follows. First, the CNT powder bed was prepared. A water drop was deposited on the powder bed. Upon gentle rolling of the water droplet on the powder bed, the liquid became entirely encapsulated by the powder, resulting in a liquid marble. With the use of highly absorptive materials such as CNT, which is capable of locally converting NIR light energy into heat, concentrated light can generate thermal surface tension gradients (Marangoni effect), causing the liquid marbles to move on the surface of bulk water. When liquid marbles made from CNT were subjected to NIR irradiation on the surface of bulk water, they immediately moved and ruptured. The disintegration time was defined as the time required for the liquid marble to rupture after NIR irradiation.

Manas K. Panda
New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE
Title: Adaptive and Actuating Single Crystals: Towards Smart Materials and Artificial Molecular Machinery
Biography:
Dr. Manas Panda has completed his PhD from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India and currently pursuing postdoctoral studies with Prof. Pance Naumov at New York University Abu Dhabi. His present research interest includes stimuli responsive crystalline material, solid state phase transition, crystal engineering etc. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals, including Nature Chemistry, Nature Communication, Journal of American Chemical Society.

Abstract:
Smart and adaptive materials, so called adaptronics, that are capable of changing shape, size or actuating themselves in response to external stimuli are of prime interest in developing artificial soft machinery. These materials can rapidly transform external energy into mechanical motion and could be used for collective transformationof nanoscale molecular motion to macroscopic motions or for actuation of other objects. The basic design principle of these materials relies on mimicking the operation of biogenic actuators by adopting structural and functional features through modulation of structure or composition at molecular level. Upon exposure to external stimuli, the material should be able to generate local force and deform for actuation, while retaining the overall mechanical compliance of the structural hierarchy. This emerging field is expanding rapidly and has already brought up an increasing number of single crystals that can hop, bend, curl, swim or twist when exposed to light, heat, or external pressure. Owing to their highly ordered structures and favorable elastic properties, single crystal actuators are expected to provide much faster energy transfer and macroscopic motion than polymeric actuators. Among these soft actuating systems, one of the most important materials are thermosalient crystals that undergo thermo-mechanical effect as a result of solid-solid phase transition induced by heat that changes the packing structure of the crystal lattice. Some of these crystals are exceptionally robust and can undergo mechanical actuation in several thermal cycles without any disintegration of the crystal. Another important class of materials are the bendable crystals, which undergo plastic deformationwhen external local pressure is appliedas a result of regenerative weak molecular interaction along the slip planes inside the crystal lattice. This rare combination of properties has the potential for application in load-bearing miniature devices, artificial muscles, biomaterials, etc. Despite the potential importance of themechanically responsive crystalline materials, the detailed mechanism of actuation and shape change have remained elusive. In this regard, our group has significantly contributed in discovering such single-crystalline actuators and explaining the actuating mechanisms. In this talk, I will briefly discuss the exotic mechanical properties of some of these single crystalsand their potential applications in smart materials.

Lidong Zhang
New York University Abu Dhbai, UAE
Title: Photogatinged Humidity-Driven Motility
Biography:
Dr. Lidong Zhang now is a postdoctoral associate of material chemistry in Professor Naumov group, in New York University Abu Dhabi. His current research interests focus on novel smart polymer hydrogel actuators for energy transfer, biosensor and soft robot. He got his PhD from Pusan National University Korea, where he was working on smart polymer hydrogels for drug delivery, mineralization and catalysis under guidance of Professor Il Kim.

Abstract:
Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications which require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Herein we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapor by a flexible dynamic element which harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings was prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min−1. The element can lift objects ~85 times heavier and can transport cargos ~20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for a new generation of smart biomimetic hybrids.

Anna N. Popova
Kemerovo Scientific Center of the Siberian Branch of the RAS, Russia
Title: Research of Graphite Crystal Structure by XRD-Analysis
Biography:
Dr. Anna N. Popova has completed her Ph.D. at the age of 29 years from Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. She is the Researcher of Institute of Coal-chemistry and Material Science of the Siberian Branch of the RAS. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an reviewer of repute (Materials Letters).

Abstract:
To achieve high values of thermo and electrophysical properties of graphite for technology and engineering a high-temperature treatment is needed for carrying out full graphitization. Attention of many scientists is concentrated on both the problem of choosing of the most effective assessment criteria of the graphitization degree and how these criteria represent the physicochemical properties of graphite. It is known that interrelation of phase structure and electrophysical characteristics of the carbon (used as the anode in lithium-ion batteries) and lithium penetration mechanism is mostly founded on Franklin model, according to the model graphite structure is homogeneous. Various origin graphites were investigated: 1 – graphite, used as an anode in lithium-ion batteries («Formula BT SL1520»), 2 – native graphite (cryptocrystalline), from Kureiskoe Resource, 3 – industrial pyrolytic (artificial) graphite. It was found by depth analysis of XRD-data and discharge capacity of anode materials prepared from initial graphites that X-ray structural characteristics of graphite and measured electrophysical characteristics of products were linked. The best correlation was shown by structural characteristics estimated for (004) plane. It is shown that phase ratio and Lc-values are closed for graphite from Kureiskoe Resource and pyrolytic graphite. The situation is different if XRD-data are obtained from (004) reflex, these characteristics are closed for «Formula BT SL1520» graphite and pyrolytic graphite. At the same time, discharge capacity characteristics for anode materials prepared from «Formula BT SL1520» graphite and pyrolytic graphite are in agreement with XRD-characteristics, too. Interrelation of some electrophysical properties of lithium-ion accumulator and characteristics of graphite-like phases in anodic carbon material, estimated by XRD for 004 reflex, is found.

Biomaterials and Polymer Chemistry
Ceramic and Glass Materials
Electronic, Optical, and Magnetic Materials
Energymaterials

Session Introduction

Moritz Graf zu Eulenburg
InovisCoat GmbH, Germany
Title: New continuous Production method of large area EL-Systems
Biography:
Graf zu Eulenburg graduated from the European Business School, London, in 1998. He worked a few years as a partner in a consulting company before he became the sales director at Coatema Coating Machinery GmbH in Dormagen, Germany. After six successful years of machinery construction of high-tech coating machinery for production and research use he became the Managing Directorat InovisCoat GmbH.

Abstract:
InovisCoat GmbH has developed a completely new technology for large area electroluminescence systems for different types of substrates like films, textiles and papers. Electroluminescent devices were usually produced sheet by sheet through screen printing with pastes including organic solvents. Now InovisCoat can produce EL-systems by applying continuously, simultaneously and mixing freewater based multilayer-systems. In addition to this some physical parameters of these systems were dramatically improved. InovisCoat stands as a spin-off from AGFA in the long-lasting tradition of high-tech functional and optical coating. A variety of applications, such as OLEDs, photovoltaic components, security or electroluminescent devices, are built from a stack of multiple functional layers which are positioned on top of each other.These layers are usually applied one after another using a crosslinking or annealing step in between if they are applied from the liquid phase. Inoviscoat is using a cascade coater where it is possible to transfer a coating package consisting of up to nine differently functionalized layers onto a substrate without intermixing of the adjacent layers. Using a roll-to-roll process coating width from 210 up to 1.100 mm can be realized. The process and the resulting products have the following advantages: 1. Production of large formats possible (roll-to-roll) 2. Environmentally sustainable 3. Economical production (multiple layers in one step) 4. High precision and productivity 5. Highly flexible films The electroluminescent systems are manufactured in various colors and can be tailored and combined with any product. It will be integrated into security signage, protective clothing (e.g. police, army), ambient light systems (inside and outside), advertising and other markets. The system is characterized by a low operating voltage of only 50-100 V.

Shiyao Zhu
Beijing Computational Science Research Center, China
Title: Casimir force between anisotropic single-negative meta-materials
Biography:
Shiyao ZHU, currently a professor at “Beijing Computational Science Research Center”, received his Ph.D. at Shanghai Jiaotong University in 1986, and was a postdoc of Prof. M.O. Scully from 1988 to 1993. His main research work is in quantum optics and meta-materials. He has published more than 260 papers in refereed journals. He is a Fellow of British Physical Society, of Optical Society of America, and of American Physics Society. He received the “Lamb’s Metal” in 2014.

Abstract:
The repulsive and restoring Casimir force between anisotropic single-negative meta-material slabs is investigated theoretically. The numerical calculation demonstrates the influence of the direction-dependent electromagnetic properties of the meta-material on the Casimir effect. The electromagnetic responses of the meta-material parallel and perpendicular to the optical axis affect the Casimir force differently. The polarity of the force as well as its relation to the slab separation are discussed. In the particular case of the restoring Casimir force, we show that multiple equilibrium of the force can be formed based on the anisotropy of the single-negative meta-material.

Agnieszka Iwan
Electrotechnical Institute, Poland
Title: Various nanoparticles in polymer solar cell
Biography:
Agnieszka Iwan has completed his PhD from Technical University in Silesia, Poland and postdoctoral studies from Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique in Grenoble, France. She received Ph.D., D.Sc. in Technical University in Wroclaw, Poland. She is the head of Laboratory of New Technologies in Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science in Wroclaw, Poland and has professor position in Institute. Her research interests have focused on the development of organic and inorganic materials for organic solar cells. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been participant of over 90 international and national conferences.

Abstract:
Organic optoelectronic devices including organic: light emitting diodes (OLEDs), field effect transistors (OFETs), liquid crystals (OLCs), electrochromic devices (OECs) and solar cells (OSCs) are wide investigated during the past 40 years regarding their potential for commercial application. A variety of innovative organic materials, including semiconducting polymers, small compounds or dendrimers are synthesized for their practical used in devices. Among various organic devices special attention is dedicated during the last ten years to organic solar cells including photovoltaic devices 3rd and 4th generations. The highest value of power conversion efficiency (PCE) of OSCs is 12%. Recent development in organic solar cells is addressed to increase value of PCE by introduce different plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). This kind of organic solar cells is classified as an fourth generation of photovoltaic devices and could include such NPs as carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide and their chemical modifications, quantum dots, various oxides such as TiOx, MoO3, V2O5 or ZnO or different metals (Ag, Au, Pt). NPs could be applied as component of (i) active layer, (ii) hole transporting layer, (iii) electrodes and (iv) interlayer in OSCs. In this work different architecture of polymer solar cells will be analyzed being into consideration place and kind of NPs in OSCs. The polymer solar cells based on new synthesized polyazomethine as donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as acceptor will be investigated. A.I. expresses her gratitude to the National Centre for Research and Development for a supplementary financial support under the 2012-2015 project No. PBS1/A5/27/2012.

Vladimir Lysenko
Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
Title: Microhardness of different-oxides nanoceramics
Biography:
Lysenko Vladimir is a Leading scientist, Institute of Theoretical & Applied Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. After the termination of postgraduate study of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1981, Vladimir works in Institute of Theoretical & Applied Mechanics in Novosibirsk. Now he is a leading scientist, DPh in physical and mathematical sciences.

Abstract:
The fine-grained (of micron approximately) ceramics based on various alumina nanopowders had created with help of the method of the spark plasma sintering (SPS). A comparison of microhardness of ceramic samples obtained from 11 alumina nanopowders and 2 their composites was held. Microhardness of the ceramics obtained both by SPS, and by the traditional method (at successive pressing and sintering) is compared. The dependence of ceramics microhardness on the phase composition of the initial nanopowder and the average size of its particles was investigated. Besides alumina nanopowders (Al2O3), there were compared microhardness of ceramics from other 10 nanopowders of oxides (SiO2, ZnO, Fe3O4, Gd2O3, CuO, WO3, TiO2, Y2O3, ZrO2, MgO) obtained both by SPS, and by the traditional method. It is obtained that the microhardness of the ceramics created on the method of the spark plasma sintering, is significantly higher than a microhardness of the ceramics obtained by the traditional method; at the SPS method the average size of grain in ceramics decreases (to 1 micron and less).

Stephen Rimmer
University of Sheffield, UK
Title: Highly branched poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) responsive to bacteria
Biography:
Stephen has completed his PhD from Imperial College, London, UK in 1992 and carried out postdoctoral studies at Lancaster University in the UK. He has published more than 110 papers in reputed journals and edited a book on Biomedical Hydrogels. He also work as industrial research scientist for 7 years on the development of polyurethanes, acrylic coatings and biomaterials.

Abstract:
Highly/hyper branched polymers have a large number of end groups that are positioned towards the outside of the polymer coil in solution. In this respect they are very different to linear functional polymers with functional groups along the main chain. These structural features mean that in water if highly branched polymers become desolvated (in a coil-to-globule transition) it is possible to maintain availability of the functional groups on the outside of desolvated globules. On the other hand, when linear polymers become desolvated the functional groups are masked by the desolvated chain segments. We have used this phenomenon to design poly(N-isoproopyl acrylamides) that respond, in a coil-to-globule transition, to binding bacteria. The response on binding to bacteria occurs as the solvation of the functional end groups is perturbed on binding. The degree of branching in these polymers is critically related to the nature of the response to bacteria and, for the most active polymers, we present evidence for a core shell type structure composed of a desovated core and a swollen shell. It is the interactions of the end groups with the bacteria that produce a coil-to-globule transition on binding. The data suggest that the end groups penetrate into the coil for a limited distance. The inclusion of dyes into the polymers can provide an easily readable signal that can be used to indicate the presence of bacteria in infected wounds or contaminated devices.

Fu-Ming Wang
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
Title: In-operando surface modification of LiFePO4 by RF plasma treatment to the applications of lithium ion battery
Biography:
Dr. Fu-Ming Wang was received the B.S. and M.S. chemical engineering degree from National Taipei University of Technology (NTUT) and National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTUST). He received his Ph. D. degree in electrochemical engineering and lithium battery technology from National Tsing Hua University (NTHU) at 2009. From 2004~2010, he is working as a researcher at the energy storage division in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and develops polymer electrolytes, functional additives, formation process design, reversible engineering and ionic transfer mechanism investigations. From 2010~2015, he services as an Associate Professor at NTUST and focuses on the researches of lithium ion battery and biosensor.

Abstract:
Governments and manufacturers in many countries have spent lots of effort developing E2W (Electrics Tow Wheel). Due to the driving force to the electric vehicle application, the high energy density of the technology of lithium ion battery is continuous developing. Because of the low price, long cycle life, environmental safety and high specific energy, the common cathode material of LiFePO4 is used in lithium-ion batteries. LiFePO4 is insulating in nature with a low electric conductivity at room temperature around 10-9 Scm-1 (compared with10-3 Scm-1 for LiCoO2 and 10-5 Scm-1 for LiMn2O4), including low rate capacity. Many efforts have been made to improve the electrochemical performance and electric conductivity of LiFePO4 at high temperature (55℃). This research demonstrates an in-operando surface modification of LiFePO4 by atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment. TEM images show that the APPJ surface modification treated LiFePO4 particles was covered by a nano core-shell infrastructure, which is fabricated by an amorphous layer. The APPJ treatment provided plasma-induced grafting hydrophilic functional groups on LiFePO4 in which is used to synthesis a nano protecting layer. This nano layer was defined by contact angle, Raman and Optical Emission Spectroscopy analysis, respectively. After the high temperature electrochemical testing, the core-shell surface modification LiFePO4 enhances the cycle life due to the transition metal Fe ion will not be dissolved from the LiFePO4 structure.

Chiara Ingrosso
CNR IPCF, Italy
Title: Photoactive hybrid materials based on colloidal nanocrystals and CVD monolayer graphene
Biography:
Dr. Chiara Ingrosso got PhD in Chemistry on 2008 from University of Bari. She has been visiting scientist at IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain), in the group of Prof. F. Perez-Murano, at DTU (Denmark), in the group of Prof. A. Boisen and at EPFL (Switzerland) in the group of Prof. J. Brugger. Since 2011 she has been appointed as permanent staff research scientist at CNR-IPCF, Bari. She has participated to several National and European collaborative research projects and currently leads CNR IPCF Bari unit in the Italian PRIN 2012 Project (Prot. 2012T9XHH7). She published 33 papers and she also contributed to several conferences.

Abstract:
Graphene (G) represents an extraordinarily attractive material for its original fundamental properties and technological potential. Colloidal inorganic nanocrystal (NC) decoration allows preparation of hybrid materials with original properties, since it provides combination of outstanding functionalities of the organic compound with original size-dependent properties of NCs. Such a strategy can be effectively applied for preparing G based hybrids, as G possesses high reactivity that can be exploited in a large variety of strategies of hybridization by means of molecular decoration approaches, both for enhancing its pristine functionalities and for conveying novel properties. Simple and facile solution-based procedures have been implemented for decorating large area, monolayer G films, grown by CVD, with size-tunable light absorbing PbS NCs and TiO2 NC/Au heterostructures, respectively. The hybrid materials have been obtained by exposing large area G film to a solution of 1-pyrene butyric acid (PBA) surface coated NCs, obtained by capping exchange onto pre-synthesized organic-capped NCs. The results have demonstrated a successful binding of NCs on G platform by means of π-π stacking interactions promoted by PBA ligand coordinating NC surface, preserving G structure. Ligand interactions provide NC assembly in highly interconnected nanostructured coatings and, upon functionalization, G results doped by charge transfer channeled by PBA from NCs. PbS NC modified G hybrid exhibits a sheet resistance ca. 3% lower than that of bare G which is ascribed to hole transfer from photoexcited PbS NCs. The manufactured hybrids can be interesting components in optoelectronics, (bio) sensors, solar cells and memory devices.

Chuanliang Feng
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,China
Title: Responsive C2-Symmetric Gelators for Three Dimensional Cell Culture
Biography:
Dr. Chuanliang Feng, received his BSc degree from Henan Normal University (Henan,China) in 1996, MSc degree from Beijing Institute of Chemistry of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Henan Normal University from 1998 to 2001,and Dr. degree from University of Twente (Enschede, the Netherlands) in 2005. After completing PhD, he was awarded a Max-Planck Society Scholarship to work at ax-Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany within the material science group led by Prof. Wolfgang Knoll. From 1998 to July 2009, he was appointed as a research scientist in Biomade Technology Foundation (Groningen, the Netherlands). In Aug. 2009, he moved to Shanghai Jiaotong University as a full professor in School of Material Sciences and Technology. He has published 70 papers with over 700 times of citation. In 2009, he was supported by Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University. In 2010, he was supported by Program for Shanghai Pujiang Excellent Talents in University and the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning.

Abstract:
The conventional two dimensional (2D) cell culture systems are considerably limited in emulating complex three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments due to the lack of structural architecture and gradient. Great efforts have been made to develop different systems for constructing 3D cell culture environment. Among these, polymeric hydrogels are frequently studied for their high water content and the adjusted biocompatible properties. Herein, A new family of C2-phenyl based supermolecular polymers is designed and synthesized, having the strong ability to self assemble into three dimensional (3D) nanofibrous structures with high efficiency in aqueous solution, which show a big potential to be used as biomemitic scaffold for 3D cell culture. With variation of physical or chemical properties, such as chirality, surface composition, the controlled cell adhesion in 3D can be achieved. The study paves new way to for achieving the controlled cell culture in biomemitic environments.

Saud A. Khashan
UAE University, UAE
Title: Magnetophoresis-based Microfluidic System for Multi-TargetCell Separation
Biography:


Abstract:
A continuous-flow, multi-inlet, multi-outlet, magnetophoresis-based microfluidic concept design is proposed for achieving simultaneous sorting of poly-sized sample of suspended magnetic beads using integrated soft-magnetic elements. This enhanced functionality is quantified using a Lagrangian-Eulerian computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. Magnetophoresis-based microfluidic systems are designed to work with a continuous sample flow. Their manipulation of magnetic microparticles, using magnetically active elements such as soft magnetic elements or electromagnets, can be categorized as either capture-based separation or continuous-flow-based separation. In the first category; the magnetic force, induced by the elements, helps the separation/trapping of the particles from a sample, i.e. by holding them against the carrier fluid flow. Such systems can be utilized in the capture of magnetically labeled biological entities as well as in their immobilization during a reaction process. In the second category, the induced force can be utilized in steering the particles inside a secondary channel or a target reservoir for collection or further processing. The choice of the bead size is dependent upon the desired applications and comes often as a compromise between the required biological functionality and magnetic manipulation. Smaller beads allows for larger surface-to-volume ratios and therefore more attachment with functional groups. Larger beads, on the other hand, have higher magnetic-to-drag force ratios and therefore are more responsive for magnetic manipulation. When magnetized by an external magnetic field, the soft magnetic elements present a viable high gradient magnetic field separation (HGMS) tool. The high gradient field concentrated around an element results in a magnetophoretic force that can be utilized in the separation of micron-sized, weakly magnetic particles. Typically, In HGMS magnetic particles (cells) are collected on or on the nearby of magnetic wires for separation. However, the main objectiveof this study is to utilize HGMS in steering a highthroughput of particles into target outlets with high purity. This can be attained by engineering the device so as to utilize the combined effects of the hydrodynamic force produced from single or multiple inlet laminar flow streams and the magnetophoretic force produced from the soft magnetic elements within the microchannel to simultaneously do selective sorting of the particles/cells based on their distinctive magnetic dealing. A concept design to achieve this objective has been presented. Experimental validation of the concept design is in progress.

N. Rajesh
Birla Institute of Technology and Science, India
Title: Comprehending the interaction between heavy metals and tailored adsorbent materials for environmental remediation
Biography:
Prof. N. Rajesh obtained his Ph.D. from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, India. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS) Pilani, Hyderabad campus, India. He has 20 years of teaching and research experience and is a fellow member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, London and also a member of several other prestigious societies such as the Chemical Research Society of India, Indian Science Congress and the American Chemical Society. His research interests include development of novel materials for the effective detoxification of heavy metals from industrial effluents. He has several publications to his credit and also serves as an expert peer reviewer for various international journals. Currently, his group is engaged in the development of novel biopolymer composites, graphene oxide and synthetic polymeric resins for heavy metal remediation.

Abstract:
The sequestration of heavy metals requires the development of effective and green adsorbent materials. In this regard, customized biopolymers and suitably tailored graphene based materials would serve as a viable option. Biodegradable polymers such as chitosan and cellulose possess distinct benefits due to the presence of amino and hydroxyl functional groups for effective interaction with toxic heavy metals. Graphene oxide is a fascinating material and when suitably modified with ionic liquids it would interact with heavy metal ions through cation-π, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. These materials offer high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption kinetics and thermodynamically feasible interactions with heavy metals. The interaction of biopolymers with long chain amine extractants also results in an exceptional performance for the removal of various heavy metals such as chromium, mercury, etc. The talk would emphasize on the interaction and application of suitably tailored biopolymer composites and graphene oxide with heavy metals and the subsequent application for remediation.

Khurram Saleem Joya
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia
Title: Hybrid Semiconductor–Molecular Heterojunction Photoanodes for Solar Water Oxidation
Biography:
Dr. Khurram S.Joya obtained his PhD from Leiden University, The Netherlands (2007-2011). After PhD and a short stay at University of North Texas, USA, Dr. Joya joined the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Mulheim, Germany (2012-2013), as a Postdoctoral Fellow. Meanwhile, Dr. Joya also obtained a Research Valorization Grant (2012-2013) from TBSC Consortium (Towards Bio Solar Cells), The Netherlands. At present, Khurram Joya is a research fellow at KAUST Catalysis Center, a visiting researcher at Leiden University, The Netherlands, and visiting scientist at LUMS (Lahore University of Management Sciences), Lahore, Pakistan. Dr. Joya is working on several projects related to catalytic systems for energy conversion and solar fuels generation, namely, surface water splitting and CO2 reduction, molecular, organometallics and nanoscale catalytic materials, photo-electrocatalysis and electrochemistry. Dr. Joya is the author of more than 35 research papers, contributed to two books and inventor of 7 Patents.

Abstract:
For solar to fuel conversion via water spliting, inorganic semiconductors have been employed in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation devices. The reaction kinetics in semiconductors is limited by poor contact at the interfaces, and charge transfer is impeded by surface defects and the grain boundaries. It has shown that successful surface functionalization of the photo-responsive semiconducting materials such as hematite (α-Fe2O3) and bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) with co-catalysts can maximize the charge separation, hole delivery and its effective consumption, and enhances the efficiency and performane of the PEC based water oxidation assembly. We present here unique modification of photoanodic hematite and BiVO4 with molecular co-catalysts for enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation. These hybrid inorganic–organometallic heterojunctions manifest impressive cathodic shifts in the onset potentials, and the photocurrent densities have been enhanced by > 90% at all potentials relative to uncatalyzed α-Fe2O3 or BiVO4, and the highly studied cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi)-semiconductor based heterojunctions. The molecular-inorganic hybrid combination is a novel development in the solar to fuel conversion field, and is crucially important for designing a tandem device where light interfere very little with the catalyst layer on top of semiconducting light absorber.

Vilas Shelke
Barkatullah University, India
Title: Nanoengineering of oxide materials for multiferroic applications
Biography:


Abstract:
Multiferroics is a new class of materials, which incipiently exhibits multiple ferroic (electric, magnetic, elastic) orderings. Bismuth ferrite is a classic multiferroic material with additional functionalities like photovoltaic, photostriction, modulation of conduction current, metal-insulator transition, terahertz radiation, etc. A lead free composition and above room temperature functioning makes it an ideal choice for variety of ferroelectric, spintronics and energy applications. However it needs to be tailored in multitudinous way prior to fabrication of workable devices. We used nanoengineering approach to explore and improve several multiferroic aspects in BiFeO3 compound. Kinetics engineering included control of laser energy and pulse rate in pulsed laser deposition technique. The reduction of surface roughness below 2 nanometer reduced leakage current by several orders and improved ferroelectric behaviour. Structural engineering through oriented substrates resulted in significantly high ferroelectric polarization value in BFO thin films. A domain engineering approach using vicinal substrates yielded the lowest ever reported coercive field in BiFeO3 thin films. This finding is very important to design effectively switchable low voltage devices. We demonstrated that the ferroelectric domains follow universal scaling law and exhibit ferroelectricity even at film thickness of 5 nm. The strain engineering using lattice mismatch can stabilize a nearly-tetragonal phase with reversible ferroelastic switching between rhombohedral and nearly-tetragonal phases. In addition, we investigated bulk composites of two antiferromagnetic perovskite oxides BiFeO3 and LaMnO3 to study change in magnetic behavior. Significant enhancement in magnetic moment was observed in composite samples, which was attributed to the uncompensated spins at the interface of two distinct antiferromagnetic phases. Similar interface engineering was studied in the composite of bulk BiFeO3 and nano La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 materials.

Ilker S. Bayer
IstitutoItaliano di Tecnologia, Italy
Title: Robust and Biodegradable Elastomers form Unmodified Corn Starch
Biography:
Dr. Ilker S. Bayer obtained hisPh.D.degree from the University of Illinois in 2007 under a NASA grant. He then moved on to pursue his post-doctoral education at Motorola and at the Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) as a materials scientist for two years. Afterwards, he returned to the University of Illinois, Department of Aerospace Engineering, as a Research Assistant Professor and spent two more years. He is currently a team leader at the Italian Institute of Technology where he conducts research on Smart Materials. He continuously receives collaborative industrial funding for research and development projects including Boeing, Rolls-Royce and Michelin. He has more than 75 peer reviewed journal papers and written several book chapters on materials and surface engineering. His research interests include polymer nanocomposites, surface science, emulsion technologies and biopolymers.

Abstract:
Designing starch-based biopolymers and biodegradable composites with durable mechanical properties and good resistance to water is still a challenging task. Although thermoplastic (destructured) starch has been an emerging alternative to petroleum based polymers, its poor dimensional stability under humid and dry conditions extensively hinders its use as a biopolymer of choice in many applications. Unmodified starch granules, on the other hand, suffer from incompatibility, poor dispersion and phase separation issues when compounded into other thermoplastics once the concentration levels exceed 5%. Herein, we present a facile biodegradable elastomer preparation method by incorporating large amounts unmodified corn starch, exceeding 80% by volume, in acetoxy-polyoragnosiloxane thermosets to produce mechanically robust and hydrophobic bio-elastomers. The naturally adsorbed moisture on starch surface enables auto-catalytic rapid hydrolysisof the polyoragnosiloxane forming Si‒O‒Si networks. Depending on the amount of starch granules, the mechanical properties of the bio-elastomers can be easily tuned with high elastic recovery rates. Moreover, starch granules lowered the surface friction coefficient of the polyoragnosiloxane network considerably. Stress relaxation measurements indicated that the bio-elastomers have lower strain energy dissipation factors than conventional rubbers rendering them as green substitutes for plastic mechanical energy dampeners. The corn starch granules also have excellent compatibility with addition-cure polysiloxane chemistry which is used extensively in micro-fabrication. Regardless of the starch concentrations, all bio-elastomers have hydrophobic surfaces with low friction coefficient and much less water uptake capacity compared to thermoplastic starch. The bio-elastomers are biocompatible and are estimated to biodegrade in the Mediterranean Sea within three to six years.

Khalid Mujasam Batoo
King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Tuning of ferroelectric properties of ferroelectric properties by Swift heavy ion for the application of random access memory (RAM) devices
Biography:
Dr. Khalid Mujasam Batoo, received his Ph.D in Applied physics from Aligarh Muslim University, India on magnetic oxide materials. He has been the project science in Inter university Accelerator centre for three years. He is at present Assistant Professor at King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He is a nano-physicist, with research mostly at the intersection flanked by Magnetic nanomaterials, Spintronics, Multiferroic-Magnetoelectric Materials, Magnetic multilayer’s (MTJs as GMR) and Magnetic layered double hydroxide (MLDH). As principal investigator, he has to his credit a number of projects of international repute approved from the American Association of Advancement of Science (AAAS). His international acclaims comprise of an academic excellence award from Dover publications New York, U.S.A. in 1998. He has authored more than 45 research papers published in peer reviewed Journals of International commendation. Besides presenting his work in a number of scientific conventions, Dr. Khalid has written and lectured widely on many aspects of nanotechnology as an invited speaker.

Abstract:
Ferroelectric materials simultaneously present both ferroelectric and spin orders, which enable them to have potential applications in both magnetic and ferroelectric devices. So, the development of such type of material, which has magnetoelectric properties in same phase at room temperature, is the milestone for modern technology. These materials have potential applications in memory devices where one can write ferroelectrically and read magnetically or vice versa. We report the multiferroic properties of polycrystalline homogeneous Bi4-xNdxTi3O12 (BNdT) ferroelectric thin films sandwiched in Pt electrodes by chemical solution deposition. Dense and uniform BNdT films were achieved by rapid thermal annealing the spin-on films at 700 °C for 3 min in oxygen environment. All the samples exhibited well-saturated hysteresis loops with remenant polarization (2Pr) increasing from 36.22 μC/cm2 (x = 0.0) to 109.86 μC/cm2 (x = 0.1), respectively, while the coercive field (2EC) = 64.6 kV/cm remained unchanged for all compositions at room temperature. Polarization offset was observed in the compositionally graded ferroelectric thin films as a function of temperature. Polarization offset was notable after 100 °C and increased with increasing temperature which may be related to thermionic charge injection, which is asymmetric to top and bottom electrodes.

Omar F. Mohammed
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia
Title: For quantum dot solar cells, size makes all the difference
Biography:


Abstract:
Flexible solar panels made from semiconductor quantum dots have great potential to be useful light-harvesting materials, opening up an optimistic view to utilize this new technology in third-generation photovoltaic devices1-3. More specifically, quantum dot (QD) solar cells have emerged as a promising low-cost alternative to existing photovoltaic technologies. Here, we investigate charge transfer and separation at PbS QDs and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) interfaces using a combination of femtosecond (fs) broadband transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy and steady-state photoluminescence quenching measurements4. We analyzed ultrafast electron injection and charge separation at PbSQD/PCBM interfaces for four different QD sizes and as a function of PCBM concentration. The results reveal that the energy band alignment, tuned by the quantum size effect, is the key element for efficient electron injection and charge separation processes. More specifically, the steady-state and time-resolved data demonstrate that only small-sized PbS QDs with a bandgap larger than 1 eV can transfer electrons to PCBM upon light absorption. We show that these trends result from the formation of a type-II interface band alignment, as a consequence of the size distribution of the QDs. Transient absorption data indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to PCBM occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs for QDs with bandgaps that achieve type-II alignment, while virtually all signals observed in smaller bandgap QD samples result from large bandgap outliers in the size distribution.In other words, the electron injection process can be tuned from highly efficient and ultrafast (<120 fs) for PbS QDs with a bandgap of more than 1 eV to nearly or completely absent for QDs with larger diameters and a bandgap of less than 1 eV. Generalizing this concept will be also presented and discussed. This information is of central importance to the design of photovoltaic devices employing QDs to harvest the near-IR solar spectrum. More generally, understanding the dynamics of the electron injection at the surface of the semiconducting QD is a key factor in determining the utility of these materials in applications that principally rely on the interfacial dynamics such as light-emitting diodes, p-n junctions, and photocatalysis.

Materials-Environment Interactions
Materials Science-Fundamentals & Characterization
Materials Processing and Product Manufacturing
Mining and Metallurgy

Session Introduction

Istvan Halasz
PQ Corporation, USA
Title: Distinction of surface and bulk Brønsted acidic sites in zeolite crystallites
Biography:
Dr. Istvan Halasz obtained Magna Cum Laude doctorate degree from the Lajos Kossuth University and the Academy of Sciences (HAS) in Hungary. In the Hungarian Hydrocarbon Institute he developed and scale-up efficient processes for pharmaceutical, fine chemical and petrochemical industries beside fundamental acid-base catalytic studies. Next in the Chemistry Institute of HAS and at USA universities he studied zeolite catalysis, high temperature superconductor synthesis, and catalytic fume abatement for automobile exhausts and stack gases. For the past 16 years he has investigated the properties of silicates at PQ R&D. Chaired the Philadelphia Catalysis Club; current president of North-East Corridor Zeolite association (NECZA); edited book, authored 110+ book chapters and journal papers, and held 80+ conference presentations.

Abstract:
The microporous nano-crystals of zeolites play pivotal role in more than 50% of heterogeneous catalysts, which contribute to manufacturing of the majority of chemical products. Their Brønsted acidic hydroxyl groups (BA-OH) are catalytically active in many reactions. The presence of BA-OH sites on the crystallite surface bears of special interest, due to limitations of micropore-diffusion. Yet distinction of these sites from the internal BA-OH sites has been ambiguous. Here we show that clear distinction can be achieved by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy when diffuse reflectance (DR) and transmission (TR) techniques are simultaneously employed. Different laboratories use these techniques inter-exchangeably for characterizing solids. To our surprise, some zeolites produced substantially different BA-OH spectra when measured by these twomethods. Since physical and chemical differences did not generated such large spectral deviations, we conjectured that emphasized vibrational intensities of the surface and bulk BA-OH groups cause the differences when one uses DR or TR technique, respectively. To prove our point we performed selective pyridine adsorption on proton exchanged Chabazite (H-CHA) and H-SAPO-34 zeolites, which are ingredients for example for the new diesel automobile catalystsor a new catalystforthe methanol to olefin, MTO, technology. We also computedthe density functional theory (DFT) based FTIR spectra of four geometrically different BA-OH groups in the bulk and on the surface of these zeolites, whichindeed confirmedthe conjectured vibrational differences.

Patrick Simon
CEMHTI-CNRS, France
Title: Raman scattering on irradiated materials: From post mortem to in situ measurements
Biography:
Dr. Patrick Simon is involved in spectroscopic studies of materials for more than 30 years. He received his PhD degree in 1986 from Orleans University (France). He is currently CNRS senior scientist in CEMHTI CNRS lab, Orleans. His main research activities now deal with Raman scattering investigations of materials in extreme conditions of high temperature or ionic irradiation, with specific developments in methodology. He authored more than 150 research papers in international journals.

Abstract:
Raman scattering spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool to probe irradiation damages in materials. A better understanding of these damage mechanisms is a key point for many domains of materials science, from nuclear industry up to spatial applications. One advantage of Raman scattering is that the length scale of irradiation-induced damage can be comparable to the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy. Two types of materials will be considered to illustrate what can be probed by Raman scattering. The first one is silicon carbide crystals (6H polytype) irradiated with 20MeV gold ions, where two different amorphization processes were evidenced: one is only due to the loss of translation symmetry leading to release of Raman selection rules; the second one is a much more disordered structure with noticeable local chemical changes. The second example is depleted uranium oxide ceramics, model material for the fuel of nuclear power plants. Irradiation with He beams induces specific Raman defect lines of still discussed origin. Detailed measurements of Raman imaging of virgin and irradiated samples shed new light on these defect lines. In a last part, an original Raman in situ device will be presented, allowing measurements during irradiation of materials with He beams on a cyclotron accelerator. The experimental device and recent results obtained of ceramic uranium oxide will be detailed, allowing recording the kinetics of damage under irradiation, and their annealing. Besides, the frequency shift and broadening of the UO2 Raman line give access to the temperature increase induced by the ion beam.

Feng Liu
Northwestern Polytechnical University, P.R. China
Title: Concurring Kinetics of Phase Transition and Grain Growth in Nanostructured Alloy
Biography:
Feng Liu, is a Professor of School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, China, and won the National Scientific Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of China in 2011, the 13th China Youth Science and Technology Prize in 2013, and became Yangtze River Scholar in 2013. The research interest of Prof. Liu concerns the theories of non-equilibrium solidification and subsequent solid state transformations. His works have made remarkable progress in the non-equilibrium solidification theories, kinetics of solid state transformation, the united theories for non-equilibrium solidification and solid state transformation, stability of metastable materials. He was awarded the First-Grade-Award of Science and Technology of Shaanxi province (once), the second-Grade-Award of Science and Technology of Shaanxi province (twice). He has published over 220 academic papers on renowned domestic and international journals, over 200 of which were indexed by SCI and EI. The H-index of Prof. Liu is 17 and total self-excluded citation is 800. His has published 32 papers in science journals with impact factor over 3, including 2 papers in International Materials Review and 27 in Acta Materialia.

Abstract:
Experimental observation and theoretical interpretation on the concurring kinetics of grain growth and phase transition in nanostructured Fe91Ni8Zr1 alloy were first presented. From in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, it can be confirmed that concomitant grain growth occurs and comes to a halt before phase transition is fully completed. From the currently kinetic description, grain growth not only adjusts the constitution of enthalpy change, but also influences the kinetics of phase transition. The present findings, offer a new behavior of phase transition owing to the size effect, and further, extend the understanding of the role grain boundary played in solid-state phase transition.

Yuh-Shyong Yang
National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Title: Molecular Interactions on Silicon Nanowire Following Various Surface Modifications
Biography:
Yuh-Shyong Yang is currently a Professor of the Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University. He received his B.S. degree from National Taiwan University, M.S. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1979, 1983, and 1987, respectively. His research interests involve in the interface between biochemistry and electronics. In particular, he is interested in the specific interactions of biomolecules and their effects on electronic responses from semiconductor devices and their applications in biomedical diagnosis. He published over 100 journal articles (SCI) in the areas of biochemistry, electronics, applied physics and analytical chemistry.

Abstract:
The polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW FET) is an extremely sensitive transducer used in real-time and label-free biosensing applications. Its low power requirement, mass production potential, and integrability with electronic components make it a highly attractive device in the rapidly growing diagnostic research field. The charges in the vicinity of a nanowire (NW) surface modulate the electrical characteristics of the NW device. We investigated the interactions of the immobilized molecules on the NW surface with the mobile charges in solutions. We experimentally observed that the NW channel conductance changed significantly upon exposure to solutions with various pH values for poly-SiNW FET devices with different functional groups. We also investigated the interactions between the mobile charged polymers and the immobilized molecules on the NW surface, and we observed the effect of charge neutrality, originating from Coulomb charge−charge interactions, on the NW conductance. This study provides a physical understanding of the charge−charge interaction of mobile charges with immobilized charged molecules on a nanoscale surface and presents new opportunities for using charge-based detection in biological and chemical sensing applications.

Xiang Li Zhong
The University of Manchester, UK
Title: New findings on FIB as nano fabrication technique for localized TEM sample preparation
Biography:
Xiangli Zhong has extensive experience in the Electron Microscope. She has been working in this field for 25 years. She is the initiator and orgainsor of the UK FIB User Group which has nearly 200 members currently. She is also one of the organizers for the FIB symposium of MMC2015. She is working as a group leader in the Electron Microscope Center, School of Materials, University of Manchester. She obtained her MEng degree in Materials Science and Engineering from University of Singapore and registered her PhD since 2006. She has published more than 25 scientific papers in the field of materials science.

Abstract:
The Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system has become a popular nano fabrication tool in materials related labs. We present several important findings on successful Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) sample preparation using this technique. We found carbon coating as a pre-treatment for low contrast materials like oxides and polymers is better than metal coatings during STEM imaging. The result shows the nano-structure of carbon spray-coated samples is cleared from the overwhelming heavy metal redeposition. To prevent loss of the precious FIB lamella, removal of the surface oxide and hydrocarbon contamination on the grid can significantly improve the “wetting” between the grid and the lamella. The in situ grid cleaning can be done in 15 seconds at 15nA which not only increases the lamella adhesion, and also leads to a reduction in the expensive Pt deposition for lamella attachment. We propose ‘in-situ filling’ methods and strategies to overcome preferential milling of internal holes/cracks which is critical on interpretation of the microstructure during subsequent TEM analysis. The redeposition material and e-beam deposition can be used to protect the internal holes/cracks. During rough-cutting of the trenches, a high ion beam current was used to produce ‘filling’ materials. E-beam deposition can be an alternative. The redeposited or the e-beam deposited material fills the holes/cracks and acts as a local protective layer during the subsequent thinning process. The resulting TEM images show the protected edges. It is shown the new method can also be beneficial to prevent failure of stressed and cracked sample preparation.

Bright Kwakye-Awuah
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana
Title: Effect of zeolite types LTX and LTA on physicochemical parameters of drinking water samples in Ghana, assisted by light transmission experiment
Biography:
Dr. Bright Kwakye-Awuah completed his PhD from the University of Wolverhampton, UK, MSc from the University of Bremen, Germany and BSc from the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. He is currently a Lecturer (Materials Science) at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi and the CEO of ZeoTeC Company Limited, the sole producer and distributer of synthetic zeolites in Africa. He has over 12 publications in the areas of zeolites synthesis and applications. He is the sole inventor of zeolite water filter for drinking water purification.He is married and blessed with two children.

Abstract:
In this study, the effect of zeolite types LTX and LTA, assisted by laser light transmission experiment on the physico-chemical parameters and the removal of iron and lead ionsin drinking water samples have been investigated.Water samples were collected from rivers, streams, and wells from Central and Volta regions of Ghana, and zeolite masses of 0.2 and 0.5 g were added to 100 ml portions of the samples in turn. Laser light intensities transmitted through the samples before and after zeolite addition were measured and recorded. The results obtained showed raw water turbidity of 33.8 NTU and treated water turbidity of 3.0 NTU (WHO recommends the limit of 5 NTU for drinking water); transmitted light intensity for the raw and treated water samples of 0.3122 AU and 0.3345 AU, respectively. Our results also showed that water turbidity highly correlates the transmitted light intensity, and water conductivity depends on dissolved metal concentrations and temperature.The removal efficiencies of laboratory-synthesized zeolite types LTA and LTX on lead and iron in water samples collected from rivers, streams, and wells from Central and Volta regions of Ghana were investigated. Lead concentrations in the raw water samples and the treated water samples were respectively 0.192 mgL-2 and 0.005 mgL-2 (allowable level in drinking water: 0.01 mgL-2); and iron concentrations in the raw water and treated water samples were respectively 2.797 mgL-2 and 0.043 mgL-2 (allowable level in drinking water: 0.3 mgL-2). The results showed that both zeolite types were effective in removing both iron and lead ions in all water samples.

Ovidiu Crisan
National Institute for Materials Physics, Romania
Title: High temperature crystallization of ternary MAX-phase nanostructured films
Biography:


Abstract:
More than 60 compounds with the general formula Mn+1AXn—where n = 1, 2, or 3; M is an early transition metal (Ti, Cr); A is an A-group element (a subset of groups 13–16) such as Si and Al; and X is C and/or N have been identified and represent a new class of layered solids, where Mn+1Xn layers are interleaved with pure A-group element layers. The growing interest in the Mn+1AXn phases lies in their layered nature and the fact that basal dislocations multiply and are mobile at room temperature. These phases are also called nanolaminates. The main reason for the enhanced interest in the MAX phases lies in their unusual, and sometimes unique, set of properties that can be traced back to their atomic bonding and structural characteristics. Like their corresponding binary carbides and nitrides, the MAX phases are elastically stiff, are good thermal and electrical conductors, are resistant to chemical attack, and have relatively low thermal expansion coefficients. Mechanically, however, they cannot be more different; they are relatively soft (2–8 GPa) and most readily machinable, thermal shock resistant, and damage tolerant. Moreover, some are fatigue, creep, and oxidation resistant. At room temperature, they can be compressed to stresses as high as 1 GPa and fully recover upon removal of the load while dissipating 25% of the mechanical energy. Several attempts have been made to stabilize bulk MAX phases but with mitigate success. One major drawback is that, currently, a temperature as high as 1300°C is needed to form pure 312 Ti-Si-C MAX phase in bulk form, a condition that is prohibitive for any industrial process. As for 211 Cr-Al-C, the lowest formation temperature reported was 650°C. Nevertheless, in the form of thin films or coatings these conditions of synthesis can be drastically improved. The paper present preliminary results on synthesizing pure 211 Cr-Al-C coatings by ion assisted deposition at substrate temperatures as low as 380°C. Also, preliminary attempts on depositing thin films of pure 312 Ti-Si-C by rotational dc magnetron co-sputtering from 3 elemental targets in UHV chamber are successfully reported, for temperatures as low as 670°C. These preliminary results are very promising in the attempt of obtaining a suitable, and industrially achievable, low-temperature hard coating.

N. A. F. Al-Rawashdeh
United Arab Emirates University, UAE
Title: A Comprehensive Characterization of Self-Assembled Monolay-ers of Aromaticselenol on Au(111): Solvent Effects, Immersion Time Effects, and Structure
Biography:
Prof. Al-Rawashdeh received his Bachelor and Master degrees from Yarmouk University-Jordan, and Ph.D. degree from Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA, in 1997. He has beena Faculty member at Jordan University of Science & Technology since 1997 and on leave from 2009-2014 at United Arab Emirates University and head of Chemistry Department from 2012-2014. He has received an award of the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research of Jordan for the Distinguished Research Paper of 2009,Fulbright scholarship, DFG and DAAD research scholarships,Fellowships for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. He has published over 40 refereed journal andconference papers, two book chapters, presented his work in over 20 international conferences and has supervised over 20 Master's and PhD students. Hiscurrent research interests are in the areas Material Sciences, such asSelf-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs), Surface-Enhanced Spectroscopy,and Corrosion, solar energy conversion, and Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Kinetic Studies of Macromolecules.

Abstract:
Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by adsorption of 1,2-dibenzyldiselane (DBDSe) and 1,2-diphenyldiselane (DPDSe) on Au(111) substrates at room temperature (RT) and 345 K have been characterized using scanning tun-nelling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Upon adsorp-tion, the Se-Se bonds in DBDSe and DPDSe are cleaved on gold surface to form phenylme-thaneselenolate (BSe) and benzeneselenolate (PSe) species, respectively. Although both the PSe and BSe species differ only in their molecular structure with an additional methyl group in BSe, the resulting films reveal noteworthy dissimilarities concerning their adlayer SAM structure and surface morphology. The molecular adlayer structure and orientation of PSe and BSe species were found to depend significantly on the immersion time (IT). For BSe SAMs, the IR data exhibited vibrational modes verifying the ad-sorption of BSe species on gold surface only for SAMs prepared for ITs longer than 1 h. Furthermore, acquiring STM-images showing individual BSe mol-ecules or any type of order was only achievable for SAMs prepared for 24 h of IT at RT. With increasing the IT, the SAMs exhibited structural changes to a lower density of molecular packing structure. The spectroscopic data also confirmed this structural var-iation by suggesting upright orientation for PSe- SAMs prepared after short ITs and strongly inclined adsorption geometry for SAMs prepared after long ITs.

Karen M. Gambaryan
Yerevan State University, Armenia
Title: Aharonov–Bohm oscillations in ellipsoidal quantum dots
Biography:
Prof. Karen Gambaryan has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Yerevan State University. He has defended the second doctorate dissertation (habilitation) and received Doctor of Science (Physics) degree at 2013. Since 2004, he is an Associate Professor and Senior Researcher at Yerevan State University. He has published more than 40 scientific papers in reputed journals and has been invited and delivered invited talks in more than 20 International Conferences and Congresses. He is a certified supervisor for PhD and Master of Science students. Under his supervision, two PhD students have successfully completed and defended their theses.

Abstract:
The InAsSbP composition type-II quantum dots (QDs) are grown on InAs(100) substrate from In-As-Sb-P quaternary liquid phase in Stranski–Krastanow growth mode. Device structures in the form of photoconductive cells are prepared for investigations. Magnetospectroscopy and high-precision capacitance spectrometry are used to explore the QDs structure's electric sheet resistance in magnetic field and the capacitance law at lateral current flow. Aharonov–Bohm (AB) oscillations with the period of δB=0.38±0.04 T are found on the magnetoresistance curve at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The influence of the QDs size distribution on the period of AB oscillations is investigated. The magnetoresistance hysteresis equals to ~50 mΩ and ~400 mΩ is revealed at room and liquid nitrogen temperature, respectively. At increasing with continuously decreasing of applied voltage, the capacitance hysteresis (CH) and contra-directional oscillations are also detected. Behavior of the CH value versus applied voltage frequency in the range of f = 103–106 Hz is investigated. It is shown that the CH value decreases with increasing frequency up to 104 Hz, becomes constant (slightly increases) in the range of 104–105 Hz, continues decreasing and equals to zero at f0=7×105 Hz. The time constant for the QDs R–C parallel circuit (generator) is calculated.

Solhe Alshahateet
Mutah University, Jordan
Title: Applications of V-shape Heterocyclic Adsorbents in the Removal of Different Organic Pollutants from Water
Biography:
Dr. Solhe Alshahateet has completed his PhD from the University of New South Wales, Australia and postdoctoral studies from the Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, Singapore. He is a faculty staff member at Mutah University, Jordan since 2007 and the former chairman of Chemistry Department at Mutah University (Jordan, 2009-2010). He has published more than 60 papers in reputed international journals, attended more than 30 international conferences, has been serving as a referee for more than 20 of reputed international Journals, and has been serving as an editorial board member of 6 reputed international Journals.

Abstract:
We are currently developing series of new V-shape heterocyclic lattice inclusion compounds using our general crystal engineering design illustrated. The target heterocyclic molecules are constructed from three distinct structural components: two planar aromatic wings, a flexible central linker group able to provide molecular C2 symmetry, and two exo-oriented sensor groups. A series of new molecules was synthesized and their ability to work as adsorbents was studied. Our current study attempted to use these V-shape compounds as adsorbents in an adsorption process to remove selected organic pollutants from wastewater. A V-shape diquinoline derivative was synthesized and used as an adsorbent to determine the optimum conditions for the removal of four types of organic pollutants from selected municipal treated wastewater in Jordan. The target organic pollutants investigated in this study were sixteen environmental priority carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), polychlorinated benzene (PCB), Phenols and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). The experimental results indicate that synthesized diquinoline adsorbent was capable to remove target organic pollutant with different degrees.