World Congress and Expo on
Nanotechnology and Materials Science
April 13-15, 2015, Dubai, UAE

Scientific Programme(Day 1 : Apr-13-2015)

Keynote Forum

Mehdi Anwar
University of Connecticut, USA
keynote: Zn1-xMgxO (x≤0.3) Nanostructures: A Versatile Material Platform for Advanced Electronics and Photonics
Biography:
Dr. Anwar is currently working on (a) ZnO Nanowire based UV detection and energy harvesting, (b) III-Nitrides and Oxide Semiconductor -based high power and high temperature quantum cascade lasers and (c) RF Oxide Semiconductor and III-Nitride HFETs and (d) memristors, to name a few. Dr. Anwar’s team pioneered the design of low noise antimony-based-compound-semiconductor (ABCS) HEMTs with quaternary buffer/barrier and ternary, with a measured fT around 200FGHz and Fmin of 0.82dB at 15GHz. He has presented over 40 plenary and invited talks at national/international conferences, published over 240 archival journal publications, conference proceedings and book chapters and edited 9 volumes. Dr. Anwar serves as an Editor of IEEE JEDS and served as an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices (2001 – 2010) and serves as the conference chair of the international conference on Terahertz Physics, Devices and Systems, at SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing (2009-2015). Dr. Anwar is an SPIE Fellow.

Abstract:
Zinc oxide (ZnO) and its associated nanostructures have been vigorously pursued for application in advanced electronics, UV detectors, chemical sensors and source for white light. The material with a bandgap of 3.37eV, that could be tailored by the addition on Mg or Co, is unique in being biocompatible and exhibiting both semiconducting and piezoelectric properties that grows in a diverse group of nanostructure morphologies. Highly ordered vertical arrays of ZnO nanowires (NWs) have been grown on substrates including silicon, SiO2, GaN, and sapphire using a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth process. Co-axial core-shell nanostructures demonstrating unique properties with enhanced detectability of chemical species has been demonstrated. The research group at the University of Connecticut, has made great strides in the growth of both Zn1-xMgxO nanowires and nanorods to demonstrate highly efficient UV solar blind detectors, chemical sensors and recently material implication logic, physically unclonable functions using ZnO based memristors. In this talk, we will present a comparison of the different growth techniques for the growth of Zn1-xMgxO nanorods and nanowires. Sonochemical growth that provides a low temperature technique for enhanced Mg incorporation will be discussed. Structural and optical properties of the grown vertically aligned ZnO NW arrays characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoluminescence (PL) will be presented and discussed. Moreover, growth and characterization of Zn1-xMgxO/ZnO core shell nanowires will be addressed. The talk will conclude by highlighting some electronic/photonic device/system demonstration.

Keynote Forum

Claudio Nicolini
Nanoworld Institute Fondazione ELBA Nicolini, Italy
keynote: FUTURE OF NANOTECHNOLOGY
Biography:
Prof. Claudio Nicolini.after serving as Adjunct Professor at the University of Bari, he moved for 17 years to the United States , of which he became citizen since 1974, and was at Brown University, MIT,BNL and Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, where he became Associate Professor of Pathology and then Professor and Chairman of the Biophysics in 1976. In 1985, he was called “Chiara Fama” Professor and Chair of Biophysics at the University of Genoa, in Italy until 2012 , where he was Director of the Biophysics Institute, the Department of Biophiscal M&O Sciences and Technologies and the Nanoworld Institute. From 1993 until now is Life President of the Fondazione ELBA Nicolini. He was Chief Editor of Cell Biophysics (USA) , Science and Technology Advisor to Italian Prime Minister Craxi, Member of the National Science and Technology Council upon Parliament election, Scientific Director Industrial Consortium CIREF, Founder and CTS President Technobiochip; President Polo National Bioelectronics , President Scientific Technological Park of Elba Island. On May 29 2008,was elected in Moscow as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and on 2010 Professors Honoris Causa of Biophysics and Nanobiotechnology at Moscow State University. From 1 November 2010 until October 31 2012 has been at Arizona State University (USA) and at Curie Paris University and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility.. Still now among the 100 Top Italian Scientists in all disciplines worldwide (H index >30). He received several awards and prizes and has authored more than 500 publications in international scientific journals (SCI), 38 patents (WPI) , 29 books and Series Editor in Bioelectronics (Plenum) and Nanobiotechnology (Pan Stanford). His main scientific activities concerned cancer research, biophysics and nanotechnology, pioneering world-wide chromatin structure-function, molecular bioelectronics and nanobiotechnology.

Abstract:
Present Challenges and Future Solutions via Nanobiotechnology and Nanobiosciences (1) exist for Health, Electronics, Environment and Energy. World-wide situation appears extremely difficult and only at the nanoscale we can hope to embark on such undertaking with some degree of success, while keeping the environment and the earth viable and growing in the process. Energy is strongly interlinked with power generation, automation and environment, while similarly is happening ( at the nanoscale) for really intelligent hardware, being strongly interlinked to communication, defence and environment. Indeed the risk of upcoming ecological disasters, including global warming, can be reduced or avoided with the development of new energy sources nanotechnology-based from sun, wind and hydrogen. The far reaching effects will be beneficial for the entire humanity and for the survival and growth of earth. It seems that when the peak of world oil production will be reached by 2030 there will be furthermore an irreversibly declining resource facing an increasing demand for energy which could not be met. Other routes must then identified for Energy, Electronics and Environment and new developments have gained interest by an industrial point of view (2, 3) and our applications to energy, environment and electronics are here exemplified . An major problem still escaping a solution to humans is cancer that is being studied with someresult at molecular scale as strongly interlinked to differentiation, ageing and proliferation, but also to ecology. Its solution requires more coordinated efforts worldwide at the basic level subtracting the lead to the corporations that have been so far quite ineffective in both side of the Ocean linked to hospital and healthrelated institutions and we will be able to solve it only approaching with quite more focus the molecular quantitative scale correlating for human race benefits all pending problems in medicine (ageing, differentiation, cancer metastasis) at the protein level. Few examples are presented for these efforts going from molecular dynamics simulations of M2 protein in potential drugs discovery to an application to influenza virus, and from NAPPA QCM_D Nanoconductometric Assay to drug-protein and protein-protein interactions for the Clinics.

Keynote Forum

Der-Jang Liaw
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
keynote: New Polymeric Nanomaterials via Precision Polymerization: Synthesis, Optoelectronics and Photovoltaics Applications
Biography:
Dr. Der-Jang LIAW, Polymer Science Doctor of Osaka University (Japan) now he is a Chair Professor of Chemical Engineering, NTUST. He has published about 360 SCI papers (h-index = 40 from ISI Web of Knowledge) and 60 patents. In 2009, He was a recipient of the International Award from the Society of Polymer Science, Japan. In addition, He received not only Outstanding Polymer Academic Research Prize and but also Lifetime Achievement Prize from Polymer Society, Taipei (Taiwan). He has been Academician of the Russian Academy of Engineering since 2011. Prof. Liaw is advisory boards member of Polymer, Materials, Polymer Journal, Polymer International and High performance polymers.

Abstract:
Advanced nanomaterials such as polyimides (PIs), polyamides (PAs), conjugated polymers and polynorbornenes (PNBs) were successfully synthesized through various polymerization methods such as low temperature polycondensation, Suzuki coupling and ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). PIs derived from different architecture designs revealed unique physical-mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. PAs with the pyridine moiety displayed good film forming abilities, flexibility, high thermal resistance and proton sensitivity. Conjugated polymers were applied for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) wrapping to separate metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Polytriarylamines- or poly(triarylamine-fluorene)-based conjugated polymers possessed water/alcohol solubility and high carrier mobility. Their HOMO levels were controlled between -4.9 to -5.2 eV to fabricate heterojunction thin film devices which play an important role in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). When alcohol soluble polytriarylamine-based conjugated polymers was used in perovskite solar cells, the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE%) at 6.3% was higher than PSS:PEDOT -based solar cell with PCE at 3.9%. In addition, nanographene-containing conjugated polymer was prepared by Suzuki coupling and its dispersion solution was measured by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) for graphene optical applications. PNBs synthesized via ROMP showed excellent transparency at about 90 % and high thermal stability (Tgs > 160 oC). Triarylamine-containing polymers cast on flexible graphene-coated PET had electrochromic properties and capacity for multiple colour change reversibilities. These polymeric materials had high organo-solubility in common solvents and as a result can be used to fabricate optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, organic field effect transistors, polymer memories, and smart windows through solution process.

Keynote Forum

Adnen Mlayah
Paul Sabatier University,France
keynote: Plasmonics driven Nanotechnology
Biography:
Prof. Adnen Mlayah is a Professor of Physics at Paul Sabatier University of Toulouse and a researcher at the Centre d'Elaboration de Matériaux et d'Etudes Structurales-CNRS, working in the field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. Main research interests are centred around the optical properties of nanomaterials and nanostructures. He authored 100 research papers reporting experimental and theoretical investigations of the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale.

Abstract:
Electron-electron interaction in metals, combined with dielectric surface discontinuity, are responsible for the appearance of strongly localized collective electronic excitations, the so-called surface plasmons. Surface plasmons have been predicted by Ritchie, in the theoretical framework of the hydrodynamical Bloch equations, and proven experimentally by Powell and Swan using electron energy loss spectroscopy. Since then, owing to the strong progress in top-down surface patterning techniques (focused ion beam milling, e-beam lithography) and chemistry-based bottom-up synthesis routes, there has been a rise of theoretical and experimental studies of the optical properties of metal nanoparticles. The interest lies in the fact that surface plasmons open a way to the engineering of the light confinement, guidance, absorption and scattering with an unprecedented degree of precision and integration. As a matter of fact, with the same metal, for instance gold, light absorption can be tuned from the green region of the visible spectrum to the far infrared simply by changing the size and/or the shape of the metal nanoparticle, as well as its environment. Moreover, because of the localized nature of the surface plasmons, light can be confined to a volume as small as a few nanometer cube, thus strongly enhancing the local electromagnetic field intensity. These basic idea have let to a new way of thinking optics. Plasmonics is a branch of nano-optics that focuses on the light-matter interaction in metal nanoparticles and nanostructures. In this talk, I will first introduce the fundamental aspects of plasmonics, and describe a variety of experimental techniques that allowed to gain a deep understanding of the physics of surface plasmons. Then, I will discuss how research in plasmonics could be translated into technological applications. Health-care and life-sciences are the main application sectors of nanotechnology which is incorporated into medical products and also into treatments of fatal diseases. In particular, metal nanoparticles can efficiently absorb and scatter light and are therefore excellent candidates for cell-imaging-based diagnosis and treatment using the photo-thermal conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat. A strategic sector, for the world-wide economies, is the production, the storage and the distribution of energy. In particular, the jump from the Carbon era to the Hydrogen era is a challenging task, currently addressed in several research labs. Hybrid metal/semiconductor nanoparticles may help to bridge the gap for the efficient and low-coast production of hydrogen. I will discuss, current research devoted to the synthesis of nanoparticles with high quantum efficiency and photocatalytic properties. I will finally give some concluding remarks.

Nanomaterials
Nanofabrication
Nanocomposites and Multifunctional Materials

Session Introduction

Abdelghani Adnane
INSAT, Tunisia
Title: Fe and oxygen plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for the Discrimination of Volatile Organic Compounds
Biography:
Prof. Dr. A. Abdelghani is a Full Professor at the National Institute of Applied Science and Technology (INSAT, Tunisia) working mainly in the field of Microsensors and Microsystems. He obtained the master degrees in "Microelectronic Devices" at the INSA of Lyon (France) in 1994, then a Ph.D thesis from Ecole Centrale of Lyon (France) in 1997. He obtained a post-doc position in Germany between 1997-2000 in the field of biophysics. He obtained the Habilitation in Physics in Tunisia (faculty of Science of Tunis) in 2004 and a Habilitation (worlwide recognition for conducting and leading research) in "Sciences pour l’Ingénieur" in 2009 at the Ecole Normale Supérieur de Cachan (France). He organized three International Conferences in Tunisia in the Field of Nanotechnology (2009, 2012 and 2014) with the Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation (Germany). He is now the leader and principal investigator of a research group working mainly on gas sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (metallic oxides, nanowires, nanoneedles, polymers) and on the development of interdigitated gold microelectrodes integrated in microfluidic cell for bacteria analysis in biologic medium. He published more than 80 papers in International Journals and supervised more than 10 Ph.D thesis and 30 masters student. He edited two chapters book in the field of optical microscopy and biosensors. Prof. Abdelghani is part of worldwide renowned scientists as editorial member of several peer-reviewed scientific journals He was a coordinator of Science For Peace NATO Project (2009-2011), National science Fondation Project (2009-2013), Tunisian Coordinator of Tempus-Project (2013-2016) and coordinator of a recent second NATO-SFP project (2013-2016). Prof. Abdelghani developed worldwide collaborations and industrial partnership. He is deeply involved in industrial applications in his field of research with implications for the design and the development of affordable and cost-effective sensing devices for diagnostics and theranostics which will have an effective impact in the developing countries.

Abstract:
Oxygen plasma functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes and iron oxide decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at room temperature. Alumina substrates with interdigitated gold electrodes are employed as transducers and the air-brushing method is used to coat them with a thin film of the differently treated carbon nanotube samples. Electrical characterization of the sensors in the presence of benzene, toluene, acetone, methanol and ethanol vapors is carried out by impedance spectroscopy. The different treatments allow for tuning the sensitivity of carbon nanotubes and it is found that combining the responses of two sensors (i.e. one decorated with Fe and the other treated in an oxygen plasma) enables discriminating the aromatic hydrocarbons from the other VOCs tested. Additionally, discriminating benzene from toluene also appears to be possible. Sensors as the ones presented here, which are operated at room temperature, may led to a new generation of affordable, mass produced portable/wearable detectors with important applications in the selective detection of benzene.

Ioannis Zuburtikudis
United Arab Emirates University, UAE
Title: A road map for the tailor-made fabrication of electrospun PVDF nanocomposite mats for a wide variety of applications
Biography:
Ioannis Zuburitkudis joined the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (CPE) in the United Arab Emirates (UAEU) in September 2012. He is also a Professor in the Mechanical and Industrial Design Engineering (MIDE) Faculty of T.E.I. of Western Macedonia in Greece. His prior appointments were at Hellenic Petroleum Company, in Thessaloniki, Greece, and the Vacuum and Electrostatics Research Lab of Eastman Kodak Co., in Rochester, NY, USA. He studied Chemical Engineering at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and continued his graduate studies in the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Rochester, in Rochester, NY, USA. His research tries to identify and understand the impact that nano-scaled dimensions have on material properties, and to use such insights to adapt and affect the design and engineering of advanced materials, surfaces and processes that may lead to valuable products. At TEI–WM, he has organized and still directs the NanoMaterials& Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (NanoMaMa Lab), while he has served as the Head of the IDE (now MIDE) faculty. His research has been funded by Greek and EU (European Union) research agencies. Since 2008, he is an active member of EU research networks in the framework of Collaboration in Science and Technology (COST) Action and acts as a Greek Management Committee (MC) member for two of these networks. He has published in various peer-reviewed journals, while he has presented his work in many international conferences.

Abstract:
Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a polymer having many interesting properties such as electroactive properties (piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric), high chemical resistance, good thermal stability, excellent mechanical properties and aging resistance, biocompatibility, and low surface energy. The fascinating intrinsic properties of PVDF combined with the advantages offered by nanofibrous mats such as high surface area and flexibility in surface functionalities render PVDF electrospun mats very useful in a wide variety of applications ranging from biomedical and energy to filtration and membrane distillation. In this work, we report a detailed investigation of the electrospinning process of PVDF with alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles and we present a road map useful for the fabrication of specific PVDF nanostructures depending on the application. The effect of five different parameters on the morphology of PVDF nanocomposite electrospun mats was investigated and quantified through a screening design (DoE). Three of these parameters are material parameters; namely the polymer solution concentration, Al2O3 nanoparticle loading, and the ratio of acetone/DMF (DMF≡ N,N-Dimethylformamide), the two solvents used for the dissolution of PVDF. The other two parameters are process parameters, i.e. the flow rate of the spinning solution and the distance from the tip of the needle to the collector. The morphology of the electrospun mats was observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and three indicative responses were introduced to represent the morphology of the fabricated mats: Average fiber diameter for the fiber size, bead density and the ratio of bead to fiber diameters to indicate the fibers’ quality. Predictive models were developed for each response that can be used in defining the optimum experimental settings for producing electrospun mats with a predetermined morphology, specific to the intended application. The results revealed that polymer solution concentration and the ratio of acetone to DMF are the most significant parameters affecting the morphology of the electrospun PVDF nanocomposite mats and thus, great consideration should be directed to these two factors in a subsequent optimization.

Nicolay A. Kulagin
Ukrainian with Germany Joint Venture “Firma SIFA”, Ukraine
Title: Ordered Sub- Nano- Systems on Crystal Surface: Design and Properties
Biography:
Professor N.A. Kulagin has completed his PhD (1978) from Kharkov State University and Dr.Sc. (1989) from Institute of Crystallography, USSR Academy of Science, Moscow. Many years work as professor in selected universities. Still now, he is the CEO of Ukrainian with Germany Joint Venture “Firma SIFA”. He is co-authors of 5 books, published more than 300 papers in reputed journals, has been serving as an editorial board member of repute and held several International Conferences.

Abstract:
Relations of electronic and crystallographic structure, and properties of nano-scale size crystallites on the surface of perfect and near stoichiometry pure and doped oxide single crystals, selected chloride and fluoride materials before and after plasma treatment were investigated on the base of original approaches. The main attention focused to study of electronic structure of ordered and quasi-ordered one and two level systems of crystallites with size near 0.1- 5 nm rising on surface of the materials over plasma flow with different particles and intensity. Two different magneto-plasma compressors, MPC, were used for plasma-treatment of the sample surfaces. Briefly, the MPC is a single-stage quasi-stationary plasma accelerator. The self-magnetic-field-sample shielding of the anode rods diminishes the level of the erosion. Anode rods are connected by a carrier, which enables MPC flux magnitude in order of magnitude of 1020 cm-2•s-1 and energy values of 5, 10, 15 and 20 J•cm-2 per impulse, respectively. Results of study of the bulk crystals and surface of the samples over plasma flow with help of AFM, SEM, TEM, ESR, magnetic, dielectric etc. techniques, XRD and high resolution X ray spectroscopy methods were analyzed on background of original theoretical approach. Change in stoichiometry relation, ions valence state for selected host and doped ions, and change in main properties, such as optical and spectral ones, conductivity, magnetic and dielectric parameters were fitted for every sample over plasma flow. Novel nano-scale size structures may be effectively used as materials and object for novel laser and photonic materials, IT-devices, scintillators and health supporting systems.

Daniel S. Choi
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, UAE
Title: Fabrication of polymeric micro-sensors by 3-dimensional printing technology combined with functionalization with gold nanowires for sensors applications
Biography:
Dr. Daniel Choi received his B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering from Seoul National University (South Korea) and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from UCLA. Dr. Choi worked as a staff member for three years at the Aerospace Corporation in California which supports the US Air Force. Dr. Choi joined Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)/NASA in 1999 as a task manager, leading a number of space-related projects for nine years. He worked on development of high sensitivity gas sensors, nanomaterial-based DNA sequencer/RF devices, MEMS-gyroscopes, and novel microfluidic ion mobility chromatograph for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project. He served as the committee for NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Prior to joining the Masdar Institute, he was an associate professor of the Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) program for 2007-2013 at University of Idaho (USA). His leadership at the University of Idaho includes serving as the MSE program director to design/improve the programs to meet the requirements of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) criteria, director of the University Nanofabrication Cleanroom Facility. Currently, he is Department Head of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering in the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Abstract:
Polymers have wider range of characteristics due to their chemical and physical properties.In recent years, nanotechnology withpolymer materials hasgaineda commendable attention in the sensors applications. There are various microfabrication approaches that have been pursued for the sensing mechanism in different sensors applications. However, there are certain limitations and flexibility issues regarding microfabrication techniques. We present a feasible study on the fabrication of the micro-sensors by using the 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The 3D printing technology is well-known as its available polymeric materials with distinguished properties and fast fabrication response as compared to other microfabrication and self-assembly processes. There are two distinguished polymeric materials,Verowhite™ and Tangoplus™ that have been adopted for the fabrication of the micro-sensors. The different complex structures and sizes of the micro-sensors have been fabricated by 3D printer. The surfaces of the micro-sensors are functionalized by thiol group and the activation of the surfaces have been subsequently brought to the attachment of goldnanowires on 3D printed micro-sensors for formation of electrodes. In this work, we have established successful fabrication by adopting 3D printing technology and subsequent functionalization of the micro-sensorswith gold nanowires for sensor applications.

Gurdip Singh
DDU Gorakhpur University, India
Title: Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies
Biography:
Prof. Gurdip Singh retired in 2008 from DDU Gorakhpur University and worked as an Emeritus Scientist (CSIR), Emeritus Fellow (UGC) during 2008-2013. Presently he is working as Emeritus Scientist (DST). His major research fields are: Nanomaterials, High Energetic Materials, Essential Oils & Oleoresins and Solid State Sulfonation. He has published more than 240 papers and 21 review articles in the journals of repute. He has one patent on, “Optical technique for measurement of flame temperature of solid propellant using the sodium-line reversal technique”. Three of his books have already been published. Dr. Singh is a life member of HEMSI, ITAS, CSI, ISCA, EOAI, ISCB and AFST. He is a recipient of Dr. Dhingra Award (1991) and NETZSCH-ITAS award (2004). He is an honorary editor of Green and Sustainable Chemistry (USA), Journal of Essential Oil Bearing Plants (India) and also reviews many of the research papers of the reputed journals. He is leading a big research group and has completed 16 research projects and one in hand, funded by various agencies. Twenty two students have already been awarded Ph. D. degree under his guidance.

Abstract:
Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies find applications in each and every sphere of life. Nanomaterials can be used for diverse range of applications, such as, nanoelectronics, optics, communication, biotechnology, cosmetics, paints, food additives, drugs, novel materials, catalysts, fabrics and many other high performance engineering materials. Nanostructured materials have been prepared due to their unusual physical and chemical properties. Nanocrystals of Cu, Cd, CdO, CdFe2O4 and CdCo2O4 have been successfully synthesized via hydrazine reduction, co-precipitation, wet-chemical and co-precipitation methods respectively. The oxides of rare earth elements such as CeO2, Pr2O3 and Nd2O3 have been widely used due to their unusual catalytic properties arising from the confinement of 4f-electrons. Thus CeO2, Pr2O3 and Nd2O3 are also synthesized by sol-gel combustion method. Nanoferrites with various morphologies such as MnFe2O4 nanorods, CoFe2O4 nanospheres and NiFe2O4 nanocubes have also been synthesized by wet chemical method under different synthesis conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were employed to study the structural features of the nanomaterials. Their catalytic activity was investigated on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) using thermogravimetry (TG), TG coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and ignition delay measurements. These nanoparticles showed good catalytic activity. Isothermal TG data have been used to evaluate kinetic parameters using model-fitting as well as isoconversional methods. Results indicate that these nanomaterials lower the energy of activation for thermal decomposition of AP and CSPs. Activation energy for ignition has also been found to be lowered in case of AP, CSPs, HMX and NTO. The burning rate of CSPs was also found to be enhanced.

Nekane Guarrotxena
ICTP-CSIC, Madrid-Spain
Title: Multifunctional hybrid materials for bioapplications
Biography:
Dr. Nekane Guarrotxena is a PhD from the University of Complutense, Madrid-Spain and was post-doctoral research at ENSAM, Paris-France and University of ScienceII, Montpellier-France. She was Vice-Director of the Institute of Polymer Science and Technology (ICTP-CSIC) (2001- 2005) and visiting professor at University of California, Santa Barbara-USA and University of California, Irvine-USA (2008-20111). She is currently Research Scientist at ICTP-CSIC (Spain), Editorial Board member of some Materials Science and Chemistry journals and External Expertise Consultant on I+D+i Management and Policy for National and International Agencies. Her research interest focuses on the synthesis and assembly of hybrid nanomaterials, nanoplasmonics, and their uses in nanobiotechnology applications (bioimaging, drug delivery, therapy and biosensing).

Abstract:
The outstanding physicochemical properties of colloidal nanoparticles have made this materials very promising for several applications in nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomedicine. These size- and shape- dependent tunable properties can also be customized by surface modification, functionalization or by developing nanocomposites with other nanomaterials and/or polymers for specific applications. Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles with biocompatible polymers and/or rationally designed molecules offers a pathway towards engineering responsive and multifunctional composite systems. A stimuli responsive polymer has a molecular structure that responds in a particular and controlled way to external influences upon it. So far, functional smart-polymers are becoming increasingly straightforward to design and synthesize nanomaterials with a remarkable range of predictable responses and other properties. Therefore, smart-polymers are used in biotechnology, medicine and engineering, as drug delivery systems, chemical separation, sensors and actuators. Furthermore, the conjugation of NPs by stimuli responsive polymers can also be used to control and stabilize their assembly, and in consequence, the symbiosis between both components (nanoparticles and wrapping polymers), can result in smart nanomaterials which combine, change or present novel properties from their individual systems. On the basis of the high interest within the scientific community, even when important research has been done along the last years on the polymer coating of NPs, the establishment of new protocols for their functionalization is still needed. This talk will highlight recent development in the area of multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, laying focus on the improved, optical response of nanohybrids depending on the impact of pH and temperature external stimuli.

Sergey S. Bukalov
The Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
Title: Capabilities of Micro-Raman spectroscopy in identification of various carbon modifications
Biography:
Prof. S.S. Bukalov has got his Ph.D in physics from the Physical Department of St.Petersburg University, his Dr.Sci in chemistry from the Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow. In 1989 he has founded the Scientific and Technical Center on Raman Spectroscopy of the Russian Academy of Sciences and is the Head of this Center. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals and was the member of Organizing Committee of International Conferences on Raman Spectroscopy.

Abstract:
Raman spectroscopy on its modern level (using microscopes and various exciting laser lines) is a powerful tool in identification of various carbon modifications. Examples will be presented resulting from investigation of many kinds of samples of industrial origin (glassy carbon, DLC films, carbon fibers, composites etc) as well as taken from inanimate nature (various graphites, shungite, Chelyabinsk meteorite) and living matter (e.g., identification of carbon nanotubes in insect legs). Raman micro-mapping with spatial resolution up to 1  allows one to infer about heterogeneity of the materials studied and to determine their composition and structure.

Anand Khanna
IIT, India
Title: Use of Nanotechnology to develop self cleaning coatings for F solar panels
Biography:
Dr. A S Khanna is the Professor at Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India with responsibility for teaching, research and consultancy in the field of corrosion, coatings, surface engineering and corrosion management.Prof. Khanna received Ph.D from in Metallurgy from Madras University from 1983-1987. Prior to joining IIT Bombay, Prof. Khanna worked in Atomic Energy and carried out R & D work at several International Labs/universities/Institutions, including Forschungszentrum, Juelich, Oslo University, University de Provence, Maseille France and IHI Heavy Industry, Japan. Notable is his/her 22 years as Professor for IIT Bombay His professional interests focus on Coatings, Industrial corrosion prevention, surface engineering, high temperature materials and his current projects include development of smart coatings and nano-technology for enhancing paint coatings In addition, he serves as Chairman for SSPC India, and is a member of NACE and ASM was recently honored with the NACE Fellow and ASM Fellow for his contributions to the work in corrosion and coatings. He has written two books and edited 4 books.

Abstract:
Inorganic-organic hybrids possess excellent corrosion resistance, better mechanical properties, and block UV radiations, in much superior way than the conventional coatings. These coatings are howeverhydrophilic with contact angle in the range of 65-70o. Thus making these coatings hydrophobic, was a real challenge. We first took an approach of introducing fluorine based silanes, as it is well known that many fluorine based organic polymers have non-stick properties for example Teflon. We tried three different fluorine based polymers and results were excellent. In order to further enhance the hydrophobicity, we introduced nanoparticles which helped a lot. The next step was to reduce the sliding angle of the water bubble. This required to change the Wenzel approach, more towards Casie model. To achieve this some silicon base nano particles were added. A non fluro approach was also chosen as flurocompounds are considered to be toxic. We concluded that hydrophobicity is a combination of lowering surface energy using a highly reactive compound and also to achieve a suitable surface roughness. The important applications of this work were then considered. The coatings were further modified to cover hydrophobicity on glass, plastic, cloth, card board, wood, cement and paper. A very superior hydrophobic character was sustained with a sliding angle of as low as 5-15o. I will also present a different approach to hydrophobicity, where instead of grafting with fluro based compound, many pigments were modified toimpart hydrophobicity, which when dispersed in paint matrix, provides hydrophobic properties. Many nano-modified coatings with commercial applications have been made in our lab, some of them already in commercial use. A glimpse of some fire-retardant and intumescent coatings will also be given.

Kar Seng (Vincent) Teng
Swansea University, UK
Title: Making nanobiosensors affordable for point-of-care diagnostics
Biography:
Dr. Kar Seng (Vincent) Teng is an Associate Professor and leads the Nanoelectronics Research Group in the College of Engineering at Swansea University in the United Kingdom. He received his PhD in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Swansea University, and has extensive research experiences in the study of nanoscale electronic materials and devices. This involves the application of nanotechnology in electronics, which has major impact in healthcare, computer, photonic and energy technologies. His group has the expertise in the fabrication and characterisation of nanoscale electronic materials and devices, as well as controlling their properties through surface engineering for novel applications. His funded research includes the investigation of low-dimensional electronic materials, such as graphene, metal-oxide and nitride nanostructures etc., in the development of ultra-sensitive nano-biosensors for the early detection of diseases, short-wavelength lasers for ultra-high density data storage, nano-plasmonics for photovoltaic technology and fabrication of nanoelectronic devices using printing technology etc. He is also a Journal Editor for Fluorescent Materials.

Abstract:
In recent years, there has been much research interest and effort in the development of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics which involve the use of nanoscale electronic materials as its sensing elements. The use of nanobiosensors in POC diagnostics for the detection and monitoring of diseases offer many advantages, such as ultra-high sensitivity, excellent specificity, rapid response time and require minimal volume of sample. The market for POC diagnostics is predicted to worth $27.5 billion by 2018. However, low-cost high-volume production of these nanobiosensors remains a technological challenge and has greatly impeded the commercialization of these devices. In this talk, the use of flexographic printing technique in the fabrication of nanobiosensors will be presented. The roll to roll printing technique enables high-speed direct-patterning of nanomaterials onto a surface and is ideal for large-scale production at relatively low cost. Furthermore the technique allows the use of polymer substrate, which would significantly reduce the cost of the device. Using the flexographic printing technique, we have demonstrated the fabrication of nanoparticle and nanowire biosensors.

Marinella Striccoli
CNR-IPCF, Italy
Title: Colloidal Nanocrystals and Hybrid Nanostructured Materials for Optoelectronic, Energy Conversion and Storage
Biography:
Dr. Marinella Striccoli is a scientist of the Italian National Council of Research - Institute for Physical and Chemical Processes (CNR IPCF). Her research interests are mainly focused on colloidal nanostructures, on their organization in ordinate assemblies and on the development of nanocomposite materials. Her expertise covers optical, morphological and structural characterization of semiconductor and hybrid nanostructures for application in optoelectronic and energy conversion. She has been responsible of National and European Projects and has co-authored more than 100 papers on JCR journals, 5 book chapters, 1 international patent and many conferences contributions in the field of Material Science.

Abstract:
The large advance of material science toward improved synthetic protocols and functionalization procedures allows to obtain inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and nanoparticles with geometrically tunable chemical and physical properties. Such nanometerials have been successfully applied as building blocks in functional assemblies and nanocomposites. In particular very small PbS@CdS core@shell NCs, characterized by an intense emission in the NIR range, with high stability against photo-oxidation, have been synthesized by a Pb to Cd cation exchange on the surface of small pre-synthesized PbS NCs and used to fabricate NIR all solution based LEDs1. Moreover orange emitting NCs, incorporated in silica beads, have been properly functionalized with blue emitting oligofluorenes to produce single white emitting nano-architectures2. Anatase TiO2 Nanorods (NRs), unquestionably the most used electrode material for sensitized solar cells, have been combined with imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), used to replace conventional electrolytes, and their specific interaction have been spectroscopically investigated3. Colloidal TiO2 NRs have been also profitably applied in the fabrication of high power electrodes for Li-batteries, by taking advantage of the organic capping to inhibit the nanoparticle agglomeration and to act as a precursor for the formation of a carbonaceous percolating network4. The huge potential in terms of properties arising from such assemblies and hybrid materials, which can be fabricated in large area and in integrable architectures, will be illustrated, highlighting the impact on technological fields as advanced optoelectronic, energy conversion and storage.

Shigeji Konagaya
Nagoya University, Japan
Title: Conductivity Enhancement of Conductive Polymer Composites by Addition of Cellulose Nano-Fiber (CeNF)
Biography:
Prof. Konagaya has completed his PhD from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan during his tenure of TOYOBO co. ltd. and postdoctoral studies from Nara Institute of Technology after his quit from TOYOBO. He is a professor of graduate school of engineering in Nagoya University, and an adviser to Filler Society of Japan.

Abstract:
Conductive polymers such as poly(aniline sulfonic acid) (PAS) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) are now applied to a polymer battery cell, aluminum (Al) condenser and antistatic/conductive agent for films. As for their application to transparent conductive films, their conductivity is required to be enhanced. So there are so many studies on additives for the enhancement of their conductivity. Cellulose nano-fiber (CeNF) with the diameter of less than 30 nm has a strong adsorbing ability to ionic or non-ionic compounds and polymers due to the Van der Waals force, the coulomb interaction and the morphological effect on its surface. So CeNF added in the conductive polymer composites is expected to form dense conductive networks through the formation of conductive polymers/CeNF adducts, which possibly contributes to the conductivity enhancement of the composites. Konagaya et al made it clear that thinner CeNF was more effective for the conductivity enhancement of conductive polymer composites, which was attributable to larger amount of conductive polymer molecules adsorbed on thinner CeNF. The details of the effect and action mechanism of CeNF will be discussed in this congress.

Songmin Shang
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Title: Carbon nanotubes based silicone rubber elastomer with excellent electrical properties
Biography:
Dr. Songmin SHANG is an associate professor in the Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). Dr SHANG graduated from PolyU in 1997 with a PhD. He has been active in both the academic world and industry many years with rich work experiences. His main research fields are the science and engineering of nanotechnology and new materials, novel textiles technology, eco-friendly and low-carbon-emission coloration technology, and sustainable dyeing-finishing technology. He published more than 100 papers, of which more than 70 are SCI journal articles and more than 30 have impact factors above 3. One paper with more than 160 citations is listed among the HIGHLY CITED PAPERS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE by Web of ScienceSM. He has made significant achievements in developing the low carbon emission dyeing technology, as well as in nanotechnology. One of his innovations, the economic method to produce carbon nanotubes on a large scale, was granted a gold medal and a special prize in the International Eureka Contest of Brussels Innova 2009. He was awarded the honorary title of “Early Career Award 2012/2013” awarded by University Grants Committee of Hong Kong, and the PTeC's Outstanding Professional Services Awards 2012 – The most valued project award by PolyU Technology & Consultancy Company Limited.

Abstract:
In the present study, we have fabricated a series of high temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (SR)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites with different MWCNTs contents. The MWCNTs were pretreated by the chitosan salt before being incorporated into the SR. The morphological, thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites were then investigated It was found that with the help of the chitosan salt, pretreated MWCNTs dispersed homogeneously within the SR matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites improved notably, in which SR/MWCNTs 8.0 wt% nanocomposites could be stretched to 400% of its original length without breaking. The nanocomposite became electrically conductive due to the incorporation of the MWCNTs. Moreover, it remained conductive without losing inherent properties after 100 times of repeated stretching/release cycles by 100%. The results obtained from this study indicate that the fabricated nanocomposites are potential to be used as the conductive elastomer or the strain sensor in the smart textile industry.

Talal Shahwan
Birzeit University, Palestine
Title: Nano iron-based materials for abatement of aqueous pollutants
Biography:
Talal Shahwan, a professor of Chemistry, received his PhD from Bilkent University in 2000, and worked after that at Izmir Institute of Technology before joining Birzeit University in 2008, where he is currently the Dean of Graduate Studies. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and many abstracts in international conferences. His research activities focus on adsorption of aqueous inorganic and organic pollutants on natural and synthetic materials. He received Parlar award of Turkey in 2006. Currently, he is doing research on synthesis and characterization of nano-iron materials and their applications in the removal of aqueous pollutants.

Abstract:
Iron nanomaterials have been produced and tested worldwide for in situ and ex situ remediation of soil and wastewaters. The effectiveness of the material has been verified for a wide range of pollutants. One of the important challenges related with the real applications of iron nanoparticles originates from their strong aggregation behavior. In order to decrease the aggregation tendency, the particles were synthesized in the presence of various supporting materials, such as alumina, kaolinite, montmorillonite, zeolite, chitosan, and others. The composite materials demonstrated high efficiencies in the sequestration of aqueous heavy metals, rare earth elements, and organic molecules over wide ranges of lab-scale experimental conditions.

Ivan U. Vakarelski
KAUST, Saudi Arabia
Title: Evaporative assembly of nanoparticles into functional networks
Biography:
Dr. Vakarelski obtained his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Kyoto University, Japan in 2001 and has since held research positions at the University of Florida - USA, the University of Melbourne - Australia, and the Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences - Singapore. Since 2010 he joined King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia as a Senior Research Scientist. His interests are in the areas of colloidal and interface science, nanotechnology and fluid dynamics. Dr. Vakarelski has authored 55 peer-review scientific papers with recent publications as lead author in Nature, PNAS and Physical Review Letters.

Abstract:
Presented will be a bench-top evaporative lithography process for nanoparticle assembly into ordered nano and micro wire structures. The original process is based on the slow evaporation of nanoparticle suspension through a surface deposited latex particles template. Alternatively we developed photolithography produced templates which enable extension of the evaporative lithography for wafer-scale, defect-free microwire network patterning. A possible application that we demonstrate is the production of transparent conductive microwire network coating that can be used as alternative for the present industry standard indium tin oxide coating. Examples of the latest developments that will be discussed include the detailed mechanism of the process and down-scaling to nano-size microwire networks.

Akos Kukovecz
University of Szeged, Hungary
Title: Sensoric applications of nanoporous materials
Biography:
Dr. Akos Kukovecz has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 27 years from the University of Szeged and Postdoctoral studies from the Institute of Physics, University of Vienna. He is the Head of the MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, a premier Hungarian research site. He has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals, served as reviewer for over 30 journals and is in the Editorial Boad of two peer-reviewed journals. His works were cited over 2000 times. His h-index is 26.

Abstract:
Nanoporous materials realized as random networks of one dimensional nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanowires) are particularly well-suited for chemical sensor applications because their conduction properties are very easily modulated by the chemical environment, andthe high aspect ratio of their individual componentsmakes them ideal materials for creating a randomized nanoporous network. The most prominent example for this is the carbon nanotube mat (“buckypaper”) obtained by the simple dead-end filtration of a carbon nanotube suspension. Earlier works on buckypaper mainly considered it as a convenient, practical form for handling carbon nanotubes. In this talk I will introduce two novel uses of buckypaper for chemical sensing. The first one involves measuring the electrical resistance as a function of time after exposing the buckypaper to a droplet of liquid analyte. The shape of this function is slightly different for each solvent. We refer to this characteristic function as the evaporation profile of the studied liquid. I will discuss the fundamental physical chemical properties of the evaporation profile and show some selected application examples. The second analytical use is in the field of selective gas sensors. Buckypaper exploits the so-called fluctuation enhanced sensing (FES) phenomenon very well.FES works by analyzing the stationary noise patterns in the electrical response of the sensor. These patterns arise from the different adsorption characteristics of analytes, therefore, they can be used to differentiate between target molecules in a way which is impossible by conventional sensor readout designs.

Zoltan Konya
University of Szeged, Hungary
Title: Surface chemistry of nanostructured materials – from the synthesis to the application
Biography:
Prof. Zoltán Kónya received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1997 and is very experienced in the synthesis and characterization of low dimensional systems; he worked for years in the laboratories of Prof. János B. Nagy (FUNDP, Namur) and Prof. Gábor Somorjai (Berkeley). He co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed papers and 12 patents, has over 4000 independent citations and his h-index is 36. He is Editor-in-chief of the journal „Nanopages”, member of Editorial Board of Catalysis Letters, and chair of the organizing committee of the international SIWAN nanoscience workshop series.He was the scientific leader of several FP6& FP7 European projects.

Abstract:
Rapid technological evolution in the past years could not have been realized without the development of new functional nanostructured materials. The nanostructures (i.e., quantum dots, nanoparticles, nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes) have gained steadily growing interest in the field of nanotechnology owing to their fascinating and unique properties. The controlled preparation and design of these 0D and 1D nanomaterials opened new frontiers for our technological, industrial and medical evolution. Several advanced technologies are available for the preparation of precisely designed nanomaterials, however, most of these are rather time- and energy-intensive. The development of simple, fast and cheap synthetic methods is essential for facilitating the industrial and medical application of the novel materials. However, the evaluation of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, including size, surface area, solubility, chemical composition, shape, agglomeration state, crystal structure, surface energy, surface charge, surface morphology, and surface coating is also a very important step towards understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and the environment. In this presentation the formation processes, the physico-chemical properties and the surface chemistry of different nanomaterials will be discussed as well as some possible application will be addressed.

M Rezeq
Khalifa University of Science Technology and Research, UAE
Title: Nano-probes fabrication techniques and their crucial applications in nanotechnology
Biography:
Dr. Rezeq is an assistant Professor at KhalifaUniversity of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Before joining Khalifa University he worked in nanotechnology research centers in Canada and Singapore. He developed some techniques for fabricating nano-probes with an apexradius in the range of 1 nm.

Abstract:
Nano-probes are sharp needle-like tools made from metal and semiconductor materials with an apex radius of a few nanometers. These nano-probes are attracting a growing interest due to their directapplications invariousaspectsof nanotechnology, specially in nanofabrication and nano-characterization. In electron and ion microscopes,nano-probes can significantly improve the image brightness and contrast due to the focused and bright electron and ion beams that can be generated from the sharp end of the nano-tip. We will review some known methods for fabricatingsuch nano-probes, with a focus on the most recent techniques where nano-probes with a radius around 1 nm can be readily fabricated.

Qiubao Ouyang
Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Title: Cylindrical aluminum matrix composites reinforced with pyrolytic carbon/carbon fibers manufactured by vacuum pressure infiltration
Biography:


Abstract:
Pyrolytic carbon/continuous carbon fibers reinforced 2A14 aluminum composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure infiltration. The pyrolytic carbon was coated on carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition method in order to prevent interfacial reactions between carbon fibers and aluminum and improve the thermal properties of the composites. Continuous carbon fibers were first weaved into cylindrical preform, and then coated with pyrolytic carbon in a chemical vapor deposition furnace. The coated preform was fixed in a special die which was designed for this experiment, and then infiltrated with aluminum alloys. This near-net-shape method simplifies process flows and reduces cost. The optimum temperature and pressure of Vacuum pressure infiltration are 720℃ and 10MPa. Optical microscope, X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the interface and microstructure of the composites. It shows that the resulting composites have a fine and clean interface and a dense structure. The resulting composites exhibit better mechanical properties and thermal properties than the uncoated carbon fibers reinforced aluminum composites due to the beneficial effects of the pyrolytic carbon coatings.

Paul C. H. Li
Simon Fraser University, Canada
Title: Targeted acceleration of DNA dehybridization using Gold nanoparticles offers specificity without compromising sensitivity for nucleic acid analyses
Biography:
Dr. Paul Li obtained his PhD in the University of Toronto in 1995. Then he pioneered the microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology at the University of Alberta. He continues and expands this work together with nanotechnology at Simon Fraser University in Canada where he is now full professor. Dr. Li has published a monograph: Fundamentals of lab on a chip for biological analysis and discovery, and is associate editor of Canadian Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences. He is the inventor of 4 patented technology, and is the founder of ZellChip Technologies Inc. specializing in microfluidic-based instrument for cellular and DNA analysis.

Abstract:
We report a method that uses 5 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to enhance the specificity of DNA hybridization without compromising the detection sensitivity of hybridized duplexes. The conventional use of high temperature/low salt conditions to enhance the specificity of DNA hybridization-based assays creates a destabilizing environment that affect both specific and nonspecific duplexes, thus, the specificity is achieved only at the expense of the signal intensity or sensitivity. On the other hand, in the new method, AuNPs predominantly target nonspecific duplexes, and accelerate the dehybridization of the non-specific duplexes but not the specific ones, offering specificity without reducing sensitivity. This method does not require heating or low-salt wash, and it is robust upon sequence variation and is compatible with multiplexed DNA analyses, and therefore, can be potentially useful to enhance the accuracy of DNA hybridization results. This AuNP wash technique has been proved to be effective in detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical samples at room temperature in a CD-NanoBioArray chip.

Sergey Dobrin
University of Toronto, Canada
Title: Looking for better nanocatalysts. Size and structural effects in CO oxidation and methanol decomposition on Pt nanoclusters
Biography:
Dr. Dobrin obtained his Master’s Degree in Physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. He completed Ph.D. studies at the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. Later he studied photoinduced reactions on metal nanoclusters and silicon surfaces in the group of Professor Polanyi at the University of Toronto, Canada, and conducted theoretical research of the catalytic reactions on solid surfaces and nanoparticles with Professor Nørskov at the Danish Institute of Technology. Currently he studies catalytic reactions on metal nanoclusters.

Abstract:
Platinum nanoclusters are widely used as catalysts for various processes, such as oxidation reactions and catalytic reactions of organic molecules. To optimize the performance of the platinum catalyst it is important to understand the mechanisms of the catalytic reactions on a molecular level and to study how various parameters of the clusters, such as cluster’s size and shape, affect the rate of the reaction and the efficiency of the catalyst. In the current work, CO oxidation and methanol decomposition on platinum nanoclusters of various sizes and shapes were studied using the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Obtained results are used to understand the role of various adsorption sites on the cluster and the differences between the various facets. The results of calculations suggest that clusters between one and two nm in size may provide better conditions for CO oxidation than clusters of other sizes, in agreement with previously published experimental data. Reaction intermediates of methanol dehydration on Pt nanoclusters were studied at high and low coordinated sites as well as on (111) and (100) facets. Activation energies on various adsorption sites were calculated and compared.

Weon Bae Ko
Sahmyook University, South Korea
Title: Preparation of Hybrid Nanocomposites and Kinetics for Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Dyes
Biography:
Prof. Weon-Bae Ko obtained his PhD (Chemistry) from Sejong University in 1995. He did his post-doc in nano-chemistry in University of California, Davis, U.S.A. in 1999. He is presently a Professor in the Department of Chemistry in Sahmyook University. His research interests are in the application of various carbon nanomaterials and nanochemistry for synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles as well as application of sonochemistry for self-assembled multilayer films chemistry. He is also studying photocatalysts with hybrid nanocomposites. He has published about 100 papers and holds one patent.

Abstract:
Various metal oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by combining a solution containing metal salt in distilled water with an alkali solution under non-classical condition. Hybrid nanocomposites were synthesized with carbon nanomaterials and various metal oxide nanoparticles in an electric furnace at 700 °C for 2 hours. The heated hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, UV-vis spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the heated hybrid nanocomposites as a catalyst in the photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes. The photocatalytic activity of the heated hybrid nanocomposites was compared with that of metal oxide and metal sulfide nanoparticles itself in organic dyes under ultraviolet light at 254 nm. We have discussed about kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes with hybrid nanocomposites.

Vsile Gutsanu
Moldova State University, Republic of Moldova
Title: New sorbents and catalysts based on multi functionalization of strongly basic cross-linked polymers
Biography:
Vasile Gutsanu has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 30 years from Moldova State University and Dr.S. at the age of 49 from Moldova State University. He is the physical chemistry professor at MSU. He has published more than 220 papersin reputed journals,gold, silver and bronze medals at International salons of inventions.

Abstract:
Strongly basic cross-linked polymers are widely used in technologies of concentration, separation and purification of different types of water and gases, especially in water treatment at thermoelectric and nuclear stations. The biggest drawback of ionic cross-linked polymers containing strongly basic groups is the lack of selectivity of sorption of anions, especially the inorganic ones. But the smart technologies require new materials with selective sorption and catalytic properties.Suchtype of polymers does not contain in their matrix negatively charged or electron donor atoms and theoretically they cannot interact with metal cations.However in our previous studies it was shown that in certain conditions in the polymer phase can be synthesized ultra-dispersed including nanoparticles of inorganic compounds.The compounds in the polymer phase radically changes their properties, becoming selective adsorbents and catalysts.In this report are presented research results of modification of functionality of strongly basic cross-linked ionic polymers, through synthesis of the composites in their phase by ion-molecular constructions.For investigation the polymer AV-17, containing -N(CH3)3Cl functional groups, was used. There were obtained and investigatedcomposites AV-17(Fe), Varion-AD(Fe), AV-17 (Cr), Varion-AD(Cr), AV-17(Fe-NCS),Varion-AD(Fe-NCS ), AV-17(Fe-NCO),Varion-AD(Fe-NCO), AV-17(Fe-SCC-Ag), Varion-AD(Fe-SCC-Ag), AV 17(Fe-NCS- Cu). The selective sorption of NCS- ions was investigated using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich sorption models. The transformation of composites in the acid medium also was investigated. For investigation Mossbauer and FTIR spectroscopies were used. Sizes and morphology of particles compounds in volume and on the polymer granule surface were investigated using SEM spectroscopy.

Shengfu Yang
University of Leicester, UK
Title: Superfluid helium nanodroplets: A route to novel nanoparticles and nanowires
Biography:
Prof. Shengfu Yang, PhD in Physical Chemistry, got his BSc degree in Applied Physics and MSc degree in Physical Chemistry, with expertise covering molecular physics, spectroscopy, laser techniques, ab inito calculation, mass spectrometry, helium droplets, nanoparticle synthesis and characterization. He had worked in MIT and Helsinki before he came to Leicester. He is an internationally leading scientist in the synthesis of novel nanoparticles using superfluid helium droplets as the growth medium, and he has pioneered several techniques in this field of research. His current research focuses on the synthesis of high-moment magnetic nanomaterials, novel nanoparticles and nanowires, and physical chemistry of molecules and molecular clusters at extreme conditions.

Abstract:
Although still in its infancy, superfluid helium droplets have now emerged as a uniquely powerful tool for the fabrication of nanoparticles, and a number of metallic nanoparticles have been synthesized in this way, such as Ag, Au, and Ni nanoparticles. In particular, the sequential addition of dopants to helium droplets eases to form core-shell nanoparticles, for example, Ag/Si nanoparticles. Here we report our recent progress in the fabrication of novel nanoparticles and nanowires using superfluid helium droplets. Starting with Ag nanoparticles, TEM imaging shows chains of spherical nanoparticles spinning across the diameter of helium droplets. Given that the spherical nanoparticles do intrinsic anisotropy, this observation suggests the existence of quantized vortices in nanoscale superfluid helium. On the other hand, quantized vortices can provide the guiding force to grow 1D nanostructures, which has been also exploited. Finally, we report templated nanoparticles formed by the sequential addition of porphyrin and silver to superfluid helium droplets, which led to the formation of nanoparticle dimers with a porphyrin molecule sandwiched between two silver nanoparticles. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of porphyrin by silver nanoparticle dimers has been observed.

Ghaphene Technologies
Nanodevices

Session Introduction

I.V.Antonova
A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russia
Title: New graphene-based materials perspective for applications
Biography:
Prof. Dr. I.V. Antonova defended her PhD theses fat the Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science (ISP SB RAS). In 2009 she defended her doctoral dissertation. Presently, she occupies a leading researcher position at the Laboratory of Three-Dimensional Nanostructures, ISP SB RAS. Now, Prof. Dr. I.V. Antonova has more than 240 papers published in leading scientific journals.

Abstract:
In the report we consider our latest advanced structures created with the use of graphene covalent functionalization. The first type of structures is graphene with high mobility on a high resistive substrate. The structure was fabricated by means of intercalation of widely used organic solvent N- methylpyrrolidone into a few-layer graphene with subsequent annealing which led to the formation of a high resistive derivative of graphene. Subsequent cleaning of the surface and recovering of the top layer conductivity demonstrate that this monolayer has the high conductivity, the high carrier mobility (up to 42 000 cm2/Vs) and the conductivity modulation on 4 orders of magnitude by gate voltage. These properties provide the high perspective of such structure for electronic applications. Secondly, we have suggested a new approach for the creation of fluorinated graphene. We have proposed a new simple, quick, and technological method of fluorinated graphene fabrication and have created a set of fluorinated graphene materials with significantly different properties. Among them are arrays of graphene quantum dots (QDs) in the fluorographene matrix. The spectrum of quantum confinement levels for graphene and few-layer graphene QDs in fluorinated matrix and the charge relaxation times from QDs are determined with use of charge spectroscopy measurements. A possibility to manage the carrier relaxation time by means of variation of QD thickness and assistance of daylight was demonstrated. The last effects are very promising for memory application of the graphene QDs.

Homayoun Najjaran
The University of British Columbia, Canada
Title: Engineered nanoparticles for lab-on-a-chip biosensors
Biography:
Dr. Najjaran is an Associate Professor at the School of Engineering, the University of British Columbia (UBC). He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the University of Toronto in 2002. Until 2006, he worked as a Research Officer at the National Research Council (NRC) Canada on the development of sensors for monitoring of infrastructure systems. In 2006, he founded the Advanced Control and Intelligent Systems (ACIS) laboratory at UBC where his research focuses on the development of hardware and software systems for broad control and automation applications including biomedical devices, sensors, and unmanned systems.

Abstract:
The importance of nanomaterials in full realization of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices has recently been recognized in biotechnology. Among different applications of nanomaterials, the utilization of the electrical and optical properties of nanoparticles as sensing elements has drawn the attention of researchers working in biology, health and environment applications. Engineered nanomaterials including gold nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and magnetic beads have been used to immobilize and detect biomolecules e.g., viruses, and microorganisms e.g., pathogens in LOC and POC devices. The nanoparticles have not only enabled the integration of a compact sensing module together with microfluidic sample preparation into a single platform but also significantly improved the sensitivity and selectivity of analytical processing. Our detection approach involves immobilizing specific antibodies for the analyte of interest on gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The GNP-antibody conjugates will begin to aggregate in presence of the analyte leading to a distinct change in the color of GNP from its natural red color to blue in relation to the concentration of the analyte. The detection approach is label-free, quantifiable by a computer color matching system (CCMS), and fully compatible with automatic microfluidic sample preparation steps. The presentation will demonstrate our integration of GNP-based detection into a handheld digital microfluidic (DMF) device, and provide future research directions for fully automated GNP-based POC devices used for rapid detection of infectious diseases as well as water and food quality monitoring.

Sang Ouk Kim
KAIST, Korea
Title: Nanoscale assembly & chemical modification of carbon nanotubes & graphene
Biography:
Prof. Sang Ouk Kim has completed his PhD from KAIST (2000) and postdoctoral studies from University of Wisconsin-Madison (20002), USA. Prof. Kim started assistant professor position in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering, KAIST in 2004. He is currently KAIST Chair Professor and jointly affiliated as a group leader in Center for Nanomaterials and Chemical Reactions, Institute for Basic Science (IBS). To date, he has published more than 140 SCI journal papers in the fields of Nanotechnology, Materials Science and Soft Materials. Prof, Kim got numerous awards and honors from domestic and international organizations. Detailed information for prof. Kim can be found at the website: http://snml.kaist.ac.kr

Abstract:
Graphitic carbon materials, including fullerene, carbon nanotubes and graphene, attract enormous research attention due to their outstanding material properties along with molecular scale dimension. Optimized utilization of the graphitic carbons in any target application inevitably requires the subtle controllability of their structures, electrical properties and surface energy. In this regard, substitutional doping of heteroelements, such as B or N, into the graphitic plane offers robust and reliable solution. In this presentation, my recent research progress associated to the chemical modification and molecular scale assembly of graphitic carbons will be presented. Graphitic carbons can be effectively assembled into various three-dimensional nanoarchitectures and nanocomposites exploiting scalable molecular self-assembly principles. The resultant nanomaterials possess extremely large surface and high electrical conductivity. Additionally, B- or N- doping of the graphitic carbon structures could be achieved via pre- or post-synthetic treatment. The chemically modified graphitic carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites with tunable workfunction and remarkably enhanced surface energy /reactivity could be widely employed for organic solar cells, supercapacitor electrodes, Li-ion battery anodes, and catalysts for energy conversion.

Zhiqiang Li
Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Title: Strong and Ductile Aluminum Composites Fabricated by Flake Powder Metallurgy
Biography:
Zhiqiang Li has completed his PhD from Harbin Institute of Technology, China and postdoctoral studies from Shanhhai Jiao Tong University, China. He is now a professor in the State Key Laboratory of the Metal Matrix Composites, China and focuses his research on the fabrication of aluminum nanocomposites by innovative powder metallurgy methods. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been issued more than 10 invention patents.

Abstract:
Incorporating high performance nano-reinforcement, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanosheets (GNSs) into the aluminum matrix was supposed to make a new kind of lightweight structural materials. However, such nanocomposites prepared by the conventional methods usually showed a trade off between promising strength and desirable ductility, due to the lack of interface control and architecture design, which is a fatal drawback to their practical applications. On the other hand, nacre has gained tremendous interest as a model system for developing composites with good combination of strength and toughness. In nacre, the laminated assembly of alternating protein collagen layers and aragonite tablets contributes to remarkable mechanical properties far beyond that can be achieved by man-made composites. Inspired by nacre, there are increasing efforts to artificially create or biomimick nacre’s nanolaminated structures in metal-matrix composites. Herein, a new strategy of flake powder metallurgy was explored to coordinate the strength-ductility dilemma. In this report, aluminum composites with CNTs and/or GNSs aligned between Al lamellae was fabricated by using CNT and GNS-coated Al nanoflakes as building blocks for stack assembly. Compared to the composites of the same CNT content but random distribution, the bio-inspired CNT/Al nanolaminate composites exhibited a simultaneous enhancement in tensile strength, Young’s modulus and uniform elongation. Similar behavior was also found in GNSs/Al composite. Though the underlying mechanism is still being studied, the approach of bottom-up, bio-inspired architecture control opened a door to advanced metal matrix composites with high mechanical performance.

Mohammed M. El-Banna
Ain-Shams University, Egypt
Title: Piezoelectric Effect on Spin Transport Characteristics of Ferromagnet/Semiconductor Junction
Biography:
Dr. Mohammed M. El-Banna is Assistant Professor, Engineering Physics & Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering (FE), Ain Shams University (ASU), Cairo, Egypt.He received the B.Sc. degree in Electronics and Communication engineering from ASU. He received the M.Sc. and PhD degrees in 2006 and 2011, respectively,from ASU, FE, Engineering Physics Department, Cairo, Egypt.His fields of research are Semiconductor physics, characterization, simulation and modeling of nanoscale devices. Spin dependence transport in Semiconducting nanowires.

Abstract:
The spin transport characteristics of junction consisting of ferromagnet/ semiconducting curved nanowire are investigated. The semiconducting nanowire, in the present paper, is ZnO. For a curved ZnO nanowire, tensile strain and compressive strain occur at the outer and inner surfaces, respectively. So, ZnO produces piezotronic effects when it is strained. The aim of the present paper is to study the effect of strain on the spin transport characteristics, e.g., the conductance, spin polarization and giant magnetoresistance. This can be achieved by using the effective mass approximation method and Floquet theory. Spin-orbit coupling, the effect of photon energy of ac-field and magnetic field are taken into consideration. Numerical calculations show that the conductance of the investigated junction varies with strain. Also the spin polarization decreases as the value of strain increases and attains a value  90 at low value of strain. It is noticed from calculations that the value of the frequency associated with spin-orbit coupling is affected by strain. Results show that the spin transport characteristics are highly sensitive to strain mainly due to the change in Schottky barrier height. This change in Schottky barrier height is owing to the strain induced band structure change and piezoelectric effect. The present results show that this investigation is very important and the junction studied could be fabricated for tips of scanning tunneling microscopy for sensing strain in nanostructured materials.

ChiiDong Chen
Academia Sinica, Taiwan
Title: Resonant tunneling through discrete quantum states in stacked atomic-layered MoS2
Biography:
ChiiDong Chen has completed his PhD from Department of Applied Electron Physics and Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden and postdoctoral studies from NEC fundamental research lab. Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. He is a Research Fellow in Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica. He has published more than 82 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:
Two-dimensional crystals can be assembled into three-dimensional stacks with atomic layer precision, which have already shown plenty of fascinating physical phenomena and been used for prototype vertical-field-effect-transistors. In this talk, interlayer electron tunneling in stacked high-quality crystalline MoS2 films will be reported. A tri-layered MoS2 film was sandwiched between top and bottom electrodes with an adjacent bottom gate, and the discrete energy levels in each layer could be tuned by bias and gate voltages. When the discrete energy levels aligned, a resonant tunneling peak appeared in the current-voltage characteristics. The peak position shifts linearly with perpendicular magnetic field, indicating formation of Landau levels. From this linear dependence, the effective mass and Fermi velocity are determined and are confirmed by electronic structure calculations. These fundamental parameters are useful for exploitation of its unique properties.

Abeer S. Elsherbiny
King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia
Title: Adsorption of Malachite green dye on graphene oxide nanosheets from aqueous solution: Kinetics and thermodynamics studies
Biography:
Dr. Abeer Salah Eldeen Elsherbiny is working at Tanta University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Kinetic Group, EGYPT. From 4 years till now she is working at Department of Chemistry, Science & Art College, King Abdulaziz University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She had her Ph.D. from Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Germany. She is interested in Adsorption of organic molecules at porous materials spatially nano-materials and Photophysics of adsorbed molecules at the surfaces. Also, The kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis.

Abstract:
In this study, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have been synthesized and characterized using different spectroscopic tools such as X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, infrared Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electronic Microscope (TEM). The prepared GO was investigated for the removal of malachite green, a cationic dye from aqueous solution. The removal methodsof malachite green has been proceeded via adsorption process. GO nanosheets can be predicted as a good adsorbent material for the adsorption of cationic species. The adsorption of the malachite green onto the GO nanosheets has been carried out at different experimental conditions such as adsorption kinetics, concentration of adsorbate, pH, and temperature. The kinetics of the adsorption data were analyzed using four kinetic models such as the pseudo first-order model, pseudo second-order model, intraparticle diffusion, and the Boyd model to understand the adsorption behavior of malachite green onto the GO nanosheets and the mechanism of adsorption. The adsorption isotherm of adsorption of the malachite green onto the GO nanosheets has been investigated at 25, 35 and 45 °C. The equilibrium data were fitted well to the Langmuir model. Various thermodynamic parameters such as the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) change were also evaluated. The interaction of malachite green onto the GO nanosheets has been investigated by infrared Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy.

Anita Grozdanov
University Ss Cyril and Methodius in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
Title: pH sensor based on Graphene/PMMA nanocomposites
Biography:
Dr. Anita Grzodanov, Full Professor at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy at the University Ss Cyril and Methodius in Skopje, R. Macedonia. She is working in the field of nanocomposite materials, application of carbon and graphene nanostructures in nanocomposites for various application. Anita Grozdanov is general secretary of NANOMAK Association for Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in R. Macedonia . She has published 45 papers and presented more than 60 papers on the international conferences, recipient of NATO-Research grant in 2000.

Abstract:
Last few years, nanocomposites based on graphene and polymer matrix have attracted a great research attention due to their excellent electrical and optical properties. The electrical properties of graphene based nanocomposites are extremely sensitive to charge transfer and chemical doping effects by various molecules. Infect, when electron-withdrawing molecules (NO2, O2 ) or electron-donating molecules (NH3) interact with the p-type semiconducting carbon nanostructures, they contribute to the density changes of the main charge carriers (i.e. holes) in the bulk of the carbon-based network. This behavior creates the base for application of carbon nanostructures as electrical chemical sensors. Graphene/PMMA nanocomposite films were prepared by solvent-casting method, with 10% nanostructure content, using the chloroform as a solvent. Characterization of the Graphene/PMMA nanocomposites was performed by TGA/DTA, DSC, X-Ray, SEM and TEM. The changes in the electrical properties were measured by treatment of the nanocomposite films into different pH solvents in the range from 2 to 12. Electrical measurements were performed using the KEITHLEY 8009 instruments, at 200 V for 30s, in the range -200/+200 V (average value of the 8 cycles was taken). The obtained results have shown that the Graphene/PMMA nanocomposite films treated with various pH in the range among 3 and 12 exhibited higher resistivity changes from 1012 to 1015 order.

Lubna Aamir
Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, India
Title: A Novel solution processed p-Ag-WO3/n-WO3 nano hetrojunction diode with high rectification and low cut-in voltage
Biography:
Dr. Lubna Aamir received her PhD degree in physics with major semiconductor nanocrystals in the year 2011 from Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, INDIA. She presently holds position of assistant professor in college of science, Jazan University, KSA. She has guided upto 18 M.tech. (Nanotechnology) thesis, on thrust areas of nano-science, nano-electronics and nano-photovoltaics. Her current area of research is the development of semiconductor nanomaterials and novel semiconductor nano-composites and their application in fabrication of low cost solution processed semiconductor devices like hetro and homo junction diodes, Schottky diodes, solar cells etc.

Abstract:
Recent advances in device fabrication are having a dramatic impact on the development of next generation low-cost and/or low cut-in voltage diodes. Simple and safe solution phase syntheses that yield semiconductor nanocrystals of high electronic quality have opened the door to several routes to new hetrojunction diodes. The aim of this study is to fabricate a low cost highly rectifying hetrojunction diode with low cut-in voltage. Here we are presenting novel (p-Ag-WO3/n-WO3) hetrojunction diode with high rectification ratio of 19347:1 at 1.5 V, cut–in voltage 0.89V and built- in potential 0.7V. Diode is fabricated using solution processed p-Ag-WO3 nano-composite and n-WO3 nanoparticles via dip-coating technique and analyzed for various device parameters via I-V and C-V measurement techniques. These studies indicate that this device could be used in switching, rectifiers and other electronic circuitry. Possible band structure of the hetrojunction is presented to explain current flow mechanism in the device. Information on the equivalent circuit model of the device has also been provided by the analysis of impedance measurements. The a.c. equivalent circuit model consisting of a resistance R1 in series with a capacitance C1 together in parallel with a constant phase element (CPE) is found to give a good explanation to the experimental data.

Wojtek Wlodarski
RMIT University, Australia
Title: Graphene based gas and vapour sensors
Biography:
Dr. Wojtek Wlodarski is a Professor at RMIT University, Australia. He was worked at – Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland as a full professor from 1983-1988. He received his PhD from Warsaw University of Technology, Poland in 1977. His Research Experience is 44 years of work in the field of microelectronics and nanotechnology, especially for sensor and transducer applications at 9 Universities in the USA, Canada, Australia, Holland, France, Spain and Poland. Provided successful leadership of over 50 significant research projects during professional appointments in Europe, the USA, Canada and Australia. He holds 26 patents. His membership of professional organizations are IEEE, USA, Institute of Engineers, Australia. He published 5 books and monographs (one of them in the U.S.A., one in Germany) as well as 8 book chapters and published over 380 papers in refereed journals. He presented over 200 papers at International Conferences. Many of these papers are cited widely around the world and delivered over 400 invited lectures at various Universities around the world.

Abstract:
The application of graphene for the gas sensing has become recentlya new fast growing area of interest. Graphene has the tremendous potential for developing gas and vapour sensors. This is in part due to the fact that each atom in the structure interacts directly with the sensing environment and in part due to the ease with the electronic properties of graphene can be modified by this interaction. Graphene and related materials could be combined with different transducing platforms such as: conductometric, Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW), Schottky diodes, mass sensitive, field effect transistors, optical as well as based on the noise spectra measurements. Combining these transducers with graphene results in the development of new generation of sensitive, reversible and stable gas and vapour sensors with several advantages which will be discussed. Numerous examples of recently developed gas and vapour sensors for: NO2, CO, CO2, SO2, H2, NH3, CH4,VOC and H2O will be presented.

Junji Haruyama
Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan
Title: Hydrogen-functionalized Graphene (Nanomesh) Spintronics and Magnetism
Biography:
Junji Haruyama is professor of materials science at the Faculty of Science and Technology, Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan. He graduated from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, in 1985, after which he joined NEC Corporation, Japan. He received his PhD in physics from Waseda University in 1996. During 1995–1997, he worked with the University of Toronto, Canada, and Ontario Laser and Lightwave Research Center, Canada, as a visiting scientist. Then he was a visiting professor at NTT Basic Research Laboratories, Japan, and the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo, Japan. Currently, he is also a principal researcher for a grant by the Air-Force Office of Scientific Research, USA, for a project on carbon-based high-Tc superconductivity. He has authored over 30 books and over 100 peer-reviewed articles in international journals, including Physical Review Letters and Nature Nanotechnology. He has been honored with many grants by the Japan Science and Technology agency, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

Abstract:
Graphene, a carbon mono-atomic layer, is still attracting significant attention even after awarding Nobel Prize at 2010. In particular, strong spin coherence has been highly expected in graphene because of the weak spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and weak hyperfine interaction, which are unique to carbon atoms. In the talk, I will show the following some of our latest experimental results about hydrogen(H)-functionalized graphene spintronics and magnetism; (1) Observation of spin Hall Effect (SHE) arising from SOI introduced by slight H-functionalization and its strong correlation with induced spin coherence, (2) Significant improvement of spontaneous spin polarization and flat band ferromagnetism (mostly 100-times greater) arising from nano-pore edge spins in graphene nanomesh (GNM) magnets realized by effective pore-edge-H termination using HSQ resist, and (3) Tunnel magnetoresistance structure using the ferromagnetic GNM (FGNM) as an electrode for future rare-metal free spintronics. These results must open doors to rare-metal free (all-carbon) spintronics and magnetism.

Francisco Marquez
University of Turabo, USA
Title: Graphene synthesis by plasma-enhanced CVD growth
Biography:
Dr. Francisco Márquez was born in Valencia (Spain) and received his Bachelor and Master´s degree in Biochemistry and Chemistry at the Universidad de Valencia in 1988 and 1989, respectively, and his Doctor´s degree in Chemistry at the Universidad de Valencia in 1992. He spent two years from 1990 as Director of the laboratories of Futura Medical S.A. and one year as researcher at the V-I Laboratories. From 1994 he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia. In 2001 he was an Associate Professor at the Universidad Jaime I and subsequently he moved to the School of Science and Technology at the Turabo University in Puerto Rico, USA, where is now Full Professor of chemistry. He has been Visiting Professor in several universities, most recently at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. His research interests are mainly directed toward photophysics of organic compounds in confined spaces, hydrogen technology and most recently the synthesis and applications of nanotubes, nanowires and graphene. He is a coauthor of over 90 scientific publications and 11 patents, and Editor-in-Chief of Soft Nanoscience Letters, Advances in Energy Research and International Research Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

Abstract:
The science of carbon materials is in continuous progress, being one of the most active and multi-disciplinary areas of Science. Among the carbon materials, graphene has become a rising star on the horizon of material science. Due to its unique planar structure, transparency, mechanical strength, thermal properties, and electronic conductivity graphene is a very promising material for nanoelectronic devices, sensors, energy-storage and/or transparent conducting electrodes applications. The exceptional properties of graphene are a consequence of the continuous network of hexagonally arranged sp2-bonded carbon atoms in a 2D-structure. Among the different synthesis processes to obtain graphene (i.e. chemical exfoliation, mechanical cleavage, epitaxial growth or chemical vapor deposition-CVD), the last one (CVD) is considered as the most promising procedure to obtain continuous graphene flakes with very low level of defects. Although the presence of unwanted by-products and structural damages is inevitable, this method is one of the most suitable for large-scale and controllable synthesis of graphene. Commonly, the synthesis of graphene by CVD requires a copper or nickel sheet as substrate, and alcohols or methane as carbon source. In this research, the CVD method previously described for the growth of carbon nanotubes was slightly modified to obtain graphene. Thus, a mixture of ethanol:N2:H2 was used to obtain a blue plasma at high temperature, responsible for the synthesis of graphene. A complete analysis of the as-synthesized graphene flakes has been performed using a combination of tools including scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

Ernst Meyer
University of Basel, Switzerland
Title: Nanomechanical investigations of graphene by force microscopy
Biography:


Abstract:
Frictional properties of graphene and hydrogenated graphene are investigated by force microscopy. The initial friction forces are found to be larger on graphene compared to the hydrogenated part. However, the friction contrast changes during subsequent imaging, which is related to the removal of an adsorbate film by the action of the probing tip. After prolongated imaging the frictional forces are equal within the experimental error. A second study is related to graphene on Ru(0001) prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, a superstructure is observed due to the mismatch between the two lattices. Local force spectroscopy shows, that the elevated part of the superstructure, called graphene nanodome, can be deformed by the probing tip. This elastic deformation has dramatic influence on the imaging conditions, revealing an inversion of the contrast at elevated forces. The third example is related to graphene nanoribbons, which are grown under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Using CO-termined probing tips at low temperatures the nanoribbons can be imaged with high resolution, where individual atoms are observed. Manipulation experiments, such as the pulling of nanoribbons and lateral movement, give further information about the interactions with the gold substrate.

Carbon nanomaterials, devices and technologies

Session Introduction

Lianxi Zheng
Khalifa University, UAE
Title: Controlled CNT Architectures for Electronic Applications
Biography:
Dr. Lianxi Zheng received his BE degree on Electronic Engineering from Southeast University (China), and his Ph.D. on Physics from The University of Hong Kong. He has worked in Los Alamos National Laboratory as a director’s postdoctoral fellow, CNT Technologies Inc. as a research scientist, Nanyang Technological University as an assistant professor, and now is an associate professor in Khalifa University. His current research interest focus on the carbon nanomaterials and their composites & hybrids. The potential applications include artificial muscle, e-textile, nano mechanics, nano-electronics, and energy harvest/storage devices.

Abstract:
The excellent electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of one-diamensional (1-D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide them a wide range of potential applications. They have been considered as building blocks for next generation electronics.Field effect transistors (FETs) and even logic circuits from individual CNTs have been demonstrated. However, it is vital to control the alignment and orientation of ultralong and dense CNT arraysin the aim towards fulfilling these versatile applications. Here, we have developed a subtle method to in-situ improve the alignment of CNT arrays while maintain their superior length and high density by introducing strong zipping effect and gas-guiding effect. Based on the Raman characterization of individual CNTs and by taking the growth process into account, the improvement mechanism will beelaborately discussed. FET bio-sensors based on long individual CNTs have also fabricated to explore CNT’s electronic properties. The work demonstrates a simple and robust approach to obtain aligned CNT architectures for electronic and mechanical applications.

Sean Li
The University of New South Wales, Australia
Title: Self-assembly of CeO2 nanocubes: An approach for the development of nanoelectronic devices
Biography:
Prof. Sean Li is currently leading a research group, which consists of 3 academics, 6 research fellows, 41 postgraduate students, to work in the research areas of advanced multifunctional materials at UNSW. Their research activities were/are funded with $18.5m AUD since 2005. Professor Li has published more than 240 scientific articles in international peer-reviewed journals and received a Global Star Award from American Ceramic Society 2013.

Abstract:
Nanocapacitors are the key component in resistive random access memory (RRAM) for next generation nanometre scaled electronic devices. It is believed that bottom up approach is a cost effective technique compared with the other nanotechnologies. In this work, we report a novel procedure for fabricating high performance nanocapacitors by using oxide nanocubes as colloidal building blocks. The nanocubes of CeO2, which was synthesised with hydrothermal methodology, were used to build the monolayer and multilayer nanocapacitors through the capillary force assisted self-assembly approach. Such a synthesis results in a large area of high quality ordered structure with several square millimetres due to the narrow size and shape distributions of nanocubes in non-polar organic solvents. The as-fabricated nanocapacitors exhibited excellent resistive switching properties with very large ON/OFF ratios, good reliability and stability. These demonstrate the developed technique is a promising approach for the fabrication of next generation RRAM devices.

Wesley J. Cantwell
Khalifa University, UAE
Title: The Influence of Nanoparticles on the Impact Response of Composite Materials
Biography:
Dr. Wesley Cantwell obtained his PhD from Imperial College, UK and subsequently worked as a post-doctoral researcher at EPFL, Switzerland. He worked for eighteen years at the University of Liverpool in the UK. He is the director of the Aerospace Research and Innovation Center (ARIC), a center investigating the properties of composite materials. He has published over 200 papers in Web of Science journals.

Abstract:
Nano-particles are being used in greater amounts in the toughening of advanced composite materials. It is generally accepted that the incorporation of such particles can modify the local conditions at the tip of a propagating crack and potentially increase both the measured toughness of the material as well as the overall impact resistance of the structure. This presentation will give an overview of the current state of the art in terms of the effect of nano-particles on the delamination properties and impact resistance of composite materials. Here, the effects nano additions, such as grapheme particles and carbon nanotubes, on the dynamic response of high-performance composites will be discussed.

Kin Liao
Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, UAE
Title: Graphene foam developed with a novel two-step technique for low and high strains and pressure sensing applications
Biography:
Dr. Kin Liao graduated with B.S. (Engineering Mechanics), M.S. (Engineering Mechanics), and Ph.D. (Materials Engineering Science), all from Virginia Tech. He is currently professor of Aerospace Engineering Department and of Mechanical Engineering Department at the Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR). Dr. Liao has authored and coauthored more than 100 articles in leading international journals on nano-mechanics, nanocomposites, bioengineering, durability of fiber-reinforced composites, and more recently on novel materials for energy and environmental applications.

Abstract:
We have developed a simple, two-step method of creating graphene foam (GF) with tunable densities, high electrical conductivities, and desired geometries with the potential to industrial grade scalability. We have also shown that the polymer infused composites of the GF prepared are suitable for high and low pressure as well as strain sensing. The process of developing the GF includes dip-coating of the polyurethane (PU) with graphene oxide (GO) and then removing PU at elevated temperatures while simultaneously reducing GO to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thus forming a free-standing, three-dimensional interconnected, porous, scalable, and mechanical strong GF with controlled densities, shapes, and sizes. With this method, GF densities as low as 1.2 mg.cm-3, corresponding to a porosity of more than 99.8%, have been obtained. Due to the adaptability and simplicity of the method, GF with different shapes, sizes, and densities can be conveniently prepared. Three parameters, the density of the PU template foam used, the concentration of GO suspension, and the number of dips done to make the GO coating on the PU template, can be tuned to control the density of the resulting GF. Incorporating GF with PDMS, GF-PDMS composites were obtained. Results of electrical conductivity of GF and GF-PDMS composites with different GF density and mechanical properties of GF-PDMS composite under static and cycling loading will be presented.

Jinglei Yang
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Title: Current progress of microencapsulation by graphene
Biography:
Jinglei Yang has completed his PhD from Kaiserslautern University of Technology, Germany and postdoctoral studies from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering of NTU. His research interests focus on microencapsulation, multifunctional composites and mechanics. He has done significant research work in his areas and contributed to more than 40 refereed publications. He often gave keynote lectures and invited talks in the important international conferences and acted as peer reviewer for a number of high impact journals.

Abstract:
Graphene is a 2 dimensional one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms with unusual properties. Encapsulation of core materials in graphene shell combines the advantages of constituents to achieve unique performances which are not possible to obtain from single material alone. Graphene encapsulated core/shell structures have been investigated in various areas. This talk will review the current progress on the fabrication strategies and applications of graphene-based encapsulation. Three kinds of graphene shells, five fabrication strategies and four important applications are introduced. The novel results in our group to apply graphene to seal etched holes in hollow glass beads are briefed as well. The challenges and opportunities for the future development of graphene-based encapsulation are discussed.

Huisheng Peng
Fudan University, China
Title: Wearable fiber-shaped energy devices
Biography:
Prof. Huisheng Peng is currently Professor of Department of Macromolecular Science and PI of Laboratory of Advanced Materials. He received his Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from Tulane University in USA in 2006, M.S. degree in Polymer Science from Fudan University in 2003, and B.S. degree in Polymer Materials from Donghua University in 1999. Prof. Peng worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2006-2008), US Department of Energy, before joining Fudan University. His work centers on the wearable fiber-shaped energy materials and device. He has published over 110 papers with near 50 appearing at Nature Nanotechnology, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., Adv. Mater., J. Am. Chem. Soc. and Phys. Rev. Lett. He has applied for 47 national and international patents with 33 royally transferred. Prof. Peng has received 25 national and international honors including Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry, Outstanding Innovation from US Department of Energy, DuPont Young Professor Award, Distinguished Young Scientist Fund from National Natural Science Foundation of China, Outstanding Young Scholar from Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee, Li Foundation Heritage Prize for Excellence in Creativity in USA and Chinese Chemical Society Young Scientist Award.

Abstract:
It is critically important to develop miniature energy harvesting and storage devices in modern electronics, e.g., for portable and foldable electronic facilities. Here novel miniature fiber-shaped solar cells, electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries as well as their integrated devices are carefully discussed with unique and promising advantages such as lightweight and weaveable compared with the conventional planar architecture.

Yutaka Ohno
Nagoya University, Japan
Title: Electronic and optoelectronic device applications of carbon nanotube thin films
Biography:
Yutaka Ohno is an associate professor of Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University. He received the PhD degrees from Nagoya University in 2000. He became an assistant professor in 2000 and an associate professor in 2008 of Nagoya University. He was also a Research Scientist of Japan Science and Technology Agency from 2004 to 2007, and a visiting professor of Aalto University, Finland from 2012 to 2013. He published more than 110 papers in major journals and talked more than 40 invited talks in international conferences.

Abstract:
Flexible and stretchable electronics are attracting much attention because of the variety of potential applications from flexible e-papers though wearable healthcare devices. Among various kinds of electronic materials, carbon nanotube thin films have advantages in flexibility, stretchability, and performance because of the excellent electronic and mechanical properties. Low cost manufacturing is also possible with printing techniques due to the good processability of carbon nanotube films. In the presentation, I will talk about our recent works on flexible and stretchable devices based on carbon nanotube thin films for realizing wearable healthcare electronics, including high-mobility thin-film transistors, integrated circuits, and electrochemical biosensors fabricated on plastic films. The simple fabrication processes based on micro-patterning technique of CNT films and high-throughput printing techniques will also be presented.

Ahmad ElDouhaibi
Lebanese University, Lebanon
Title: Synthesis and study of the structural, electrical and electrochemical properties of positive electrode materials LiMPO4 (M = Fe, Mn)
Biography:


Abstract:
Nanocomposites of Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) is synthesized by a Low-cost colloidal process using LiH2PO4, FeCl2 and methylimidazole (NMI) anhydrous as starting materials. The LiFePO4 product sintered at 600 °C for 1 h exhibits a good electrochemical performance. The best results were obtained with carbon coating coming from the carbonisation of organic solvent as NMI during the heating powder. The resulting carbon contents for the sample is 2.53 wt %. The physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of the LiFePO4 samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG, DTG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray Diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy techniques(SEM/TEM), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), Raman microscope system, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic tests. The Brunauer- Emmett-Teller method was used to evaluate the specific surface area while electronic conductivity were determined using four-point probe method. SEM and TEM showed particles having uniform small size (around 35 ±4 nm (n=12) in diameter) that are covered by carbon. Carbon-coated LiFePO4 exhibits electronic conductivity of 1.4x10-3 S/cm at room temperature causing a significant increase in rate capability. The full capacity (170 mA h g−1) was delivered when discharging the cell at C/10 rate in a range between 2.2 and 4.2V vs. Li/Li+. Promising results of similar work using phosphates which are composites of lithium, iron, and manganese will also be disclosed.